Four Hundred and Three Amendments to the Continuing Resolution

Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Feb. 16 2011 10:29 AM

Four Hundred and Three Amendments to the Continuing Resolution

The House Republicans have done us all a favor and posted the 403 amendments submitted to the continuing resolution -- the one that can temporarily keep funding the government. They are not all from Republicans. Reading through the amendments, one by one, is like watching a Tex Avery cartoon in which one mouse keeps trying to thwart another mouse. For example, Amendment 165 from Rep. John Carter, R-Tex.:

The amendment would prohibit the use of funds made available by this Act to be used to implement, administer, or enforce the rule entitled "national Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants" published by the EPA.

David Weigel David Weigel

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter. 

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Amendment 5 from Rep. Paul Tonko, D-NY:

The amendment would strike the provision restricting the use of certain funds by the EPA for purposes of enforcing or promulgating any regulation or order relating to, or denying approval of state implementation plans or permits because of the emissions of greenhouse gases due to concerns regarding possible climate change.

Amendment 135 from Rep. Joe Crowley, D-NY:

The amendment would strike a provision that prohibits the use funds for the Department of State, foreign operations, that promotes or performs abortion, related programs for population planning or other population assistance.  The amendment would insert a new eligibility standard.

Amendment 262 from Rep. Bob Latta, R-Ohio:

The amendment would eliminate the $440 million in funding available for Department of State, foreign operations, and related programs for international population control, family planning, and reproductive health.

And so on. But there are more Republicans than Democrats, so the GOP amendments will succeed. Ones to watch:

278: "The amendment would prohibit funds made available by this Act from being used to transfer to the United States any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba or a noncitizen captured outside the US as an enemy belligerent."

292: "The amendment would prohibit funds from being used to carry out the Tropical Forest Conservation Act of 1998."

294: "The amendment would prohibit funds from being used for the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation." (Both of these last two are from Rep. Tom McClintock, who introduced 40 amendments, or 10 percent of the total.)

341: This is the anti-Czar amendment:

The amendment would prohibit any funds made available under the Act to be used for the salary or expenses of any individual—

  • Who is serving as the head of any taskforce, council, policy office, or other component within the Executive Office of the President that is established by or at the direction of the President; and
  • Whose appointment does not require confirmation by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.

Yesterday, Amanda Terkel reported on an amendment from Rep. Steve Womack, R-Ark., that would have prohibited funding for the president's teleprompter, and which would have set a new, golden standard for legislative smartassery. It didn't make the cut.

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter.