Why George W. Bush is Like Tucker Max

Why George W. Bush is Like Tucker Max

Why George W. Bush is Like Tucker Max

Weigel
Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Nov. 22 2010 5:36 PM

Why George W. Bush is Like Tucker Max

My two favorite reviews of Decision Points are this very serious -- devastating, actually -- take from Dan Froomkin, and Paul Constant's less serious take which dual-reviews it with the newest book by Tucker Max.

Early passages in both books pivot on the protagonist's use of a bullhorn. Max writes, "Everything you say becomes one level more humorous through a bullhorn. Stupid becomes passable, passable becomes funny, funny becomes hysterical, and hysterical becomes Dave Chappelle doing Rick James." Max uses his bullhorn to yell "Go practice your throw-ins, you cheese-eating surrender monkey!" at some "European-looking dudes." With his amplified voice, he tells a "chunky girl" to get tested for "hoof-and-mouth disease" because she is "frothing at the udder." At the ruins of the World Trade Center shortly after 9/11, Bush finds a bullhorn "thrust into my hands... People shouted, 'We can't hear you.' I shot back, 'I can hear you!' It got a cheer." The bullhorn turned his stupidity into something passable, and he used those cheers to power his administration's ascent into madness. After 9/11, Bush writes, "My blood was boiling. We were going to find out who did this, and kick their ass." (Important note: Bush never did kick the ass of the person who did it. You will not learn that from reading Decision Points . As in real life, he conveniently changes the subject.)

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David Weigel is a reporter for the Washington Post.