Blogging the Last Primary*

Reporting on Politics and Policy.
Sept. 14 2010 7:01 PM

Blogging the Last Primary*

It's the last big election night before November, and I'll be covering it here and on Twitter at @daveweigel. And for part of the night I'll be at the victory party for D.C.'s delegate to Congress, Eleanor Holmes Norton.

8 p.m. - Delaware, the District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire

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Here's the big show, which could end quickly or could drag on for hours -- we just don't know how long a competitive Republican primary takes in Delaware, because there hasn't been one since 2000, and there are two tonight. Mike Castle is battling Christine O'Donnell for the U.S. Senate nod; Michelle Rollins is battling Glen Urquarht for the House nod. In D.C., anything less than a quick defeat for Mayor Adrian Fenty will be surprising. In Massachusetts, Republicans are expecting to nominate candidates for their first serious House candidates since the 1990s, and in New Hampshire, there are heated primaries for the Senate nomination and the House nominations in both districts. The left is facing a big test in the race for the Democratic nod in New Hampshire's 2nd, vacated by Paul Hodes -- if Katrina Swett wins, expect to hear sobbing.

9 p.m. - New York, Rhode Island, Wisconsin

At the statewide level, New York is the big Republican bust of 2010. Rick Lazio is fighting for his life against Tea Party businessman Carl Paladino for the right to lose the governor's race to Democrat Andrew Cuomo. Five Republicans total are battling to run against Senators Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, who both lead big in money and polls. Things are harder to read in the House primaries -- Republicans want to go after NY-1, NY-2, NY-19, NY-20, and NY-23, but they might end up with underfunded candidates -- or in NY-2, Chris Cox, Richard Nixon's grandson who has irritated almost everyone. The winners in Rhode Island and Wisconsin shouldn't surprise us, but what the turnout from the two parties.

*Except Hawaii on Saturday, but according to Dinesh D'Souza that's part of Africa anyway.

David Weigel is a Slate political reporter. 

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