Nobody Wants to Host the Winter Olympics

The World
How It Works
May 27 2014 11:15 AM

Nobody Wants to Host the Winter Olympics

471425005-dajing-wu-of-china-denis-nikisha-of-kazakhstan-and
The race for 2022 could come down to China and Kazakhstan.

Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

The AP reports that, facing public opposition and allegations of official corruption, Krakow is withdrawing its bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympics. It follows Stockholm, which pulled out in December due to concerns over costs.

Joshua Keating Joshua Keating

Joshua Keating is a staff writer at Slate focusing on international affairs and writes the World blog. 

This leaves four cities officially in the running: Almaty, Kazakhstan; Beijing, China; Lviv, Ukraine; and Oslo, Norway.

Advertisement

Let’s just assume that given current political realities, Lviv doesn’t have a realistic shot at this. Oslo is also looking like a bit of a nonstarter. According to the AP, the government has yet to secure financing for the bid and one of the parties in the country’s governing coalition has come out against it.

We know from 2008 that China is capable of putting on a good show, but its bid is problematic for a number of reasons. For one thing, there aren’t any mountains—and lately, not that much snow—in Beijing. The plan is to hold the indoor events in the capital and the snow events more than 100 miles away in the northern city of Zhangjiakou, requiring a new high-speed railway to be constructed. The IOC also usually doesn’t give the games to the same region twice in a row—South Korea will host in 2018.

Almaty, which also bid for the 2014 Olympics and was initially considered a long shot, is starting to see its prospects rise. It claims to already have many of the facilities in place and with a booming oil economy the Kazakh government should be able to afford more. After all the criticism surrounding Sochi, the IOC might be reluctant to award the games to a former Soviet autocracy with a poor human rights record, but frankly China’s an even worse choice on that score. Winning the Olympics would be something of a crowning achievement for Kazakhstan’s 73-year-old strongman, President Nursultan Nazarbayev, who has been in office since independence in 1991.

If we do end up watching slopestyle from the Central Asia steppes in 2022, it will likely be because it’s becoming clear that nobody in Europe wants to host the Winter Olympics anymore. In addition to Krakow—where 70 percent of voters rejected the Olympics in a recent referendum—and Olso, public opposition also scuttled bids by Munich and Davos.

Publics may finally be getting wise to the fact that the long-term economic benefits of hosting mega-events like the Olympics or the World Cup are usually negligible at best. This is going to mean that fewer democratic countries will make bids for them and the ones that do, like Brazil, will do so in the face of widespread popular opposition. For the Winter Olympics, where thanks to weather and geography, the number of potential hosts is small (and thanks to climate change getting smaller), the problem will be more acute. Increasingly, the only governments excited about hosting these events are the ones that don’t have to worry about public opinion.

Unless the skyrocketing costs of these mega-events can be contained, expect to see a lot more Chinas, Russias, Qatars, and Kazakhstans hosting them in the future.

TODAY IN SLATE

Politics

The Irritating Confidante

John Dickerson on Ben Bradlee’s fascinating relationship with John F. Kennedy.

My Father Invented Social Networking at a Girls’ Reform School in the 1930s

Renée Zellweger’s New Face Is Too Real

Sleater-Kinney Was Once America’s Best Rock Band

Can it be again?

The All The President’s Men Scene That Captured Ben Bradlee

Medical Examiner

Is It Better to Be a Hero Like Batman?

Or an altruist like Bruce Wayne?

Technology

Driving in Circles

The autonomous Google car may never actually happen.

The World’s Human Rights Violators Are Signatories on the World’s Human Rights Treaties

How Punctual Are Germans?

  News & Politics
Politics
Oct. 22 2014 12:44 AM We Need More Ben Bradlees His relationship with John F. Kennedy shows what’s missing from today’s Washington journalism.
  Business
Moneybox
Oct. 21 2014 5:57 PM Soda and Fries Have Lost Their Charm for Both Consumers and Investors
  Life
The Vault
Oct. 21 2014 2:23 PM A Data-Packed Map of American Immigration in 1903
  Double X
The XX Factor
Oct. 21 2014 3:03 PM Renée Zellweger’s New Face Is Too Real
  Slate Plus
Behind the Scenes
Oct. 21 2014 1:02 PM Where Are Slate Plus Members From? This Weird Cartogram Explains. A weird-looking cartogram of Slate Plus memberships by state.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Oct. 21 2014 9:42 PM The All The President’s Men Scene That Perfectly Captured Ben Bradlee’s Genius
  Technology
Technology
Oct. 21 2014 11:44 PM Driving in Circles The autonomous Google car may never actually happen.
  Health & Science
Climate Desk
Oct. 21 2014 11:53 AM Taking Research for Granted Texas Republican Lamar Smith continues his crusade against independence in science.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Oct. 20 2014 5:09 PM Keepaway, on Three. Ready—Break! On his record-breaking touchdown pass, Peyton Manning couldn’t even leave the celebration to chance.