Roy Moore: Whites, blacks, “reds,” and “yellows” not getting along.

Leading Alabama Senate Candidate Refers in Speech to “Reds” (Native Americans) and “Yellows” (Asian People)

Leading Alabama Senate Candidate Refers in Speech to “Reds” (Native Americans) and “Yellows” (Asian People)

The Slatest
Your News Companion
Sept. 18 2017 3:52 PM

Leading Alabama Senate Candidate Refers in Speech to “Reds” (Native Americans) and “Yellows” (Asian People)

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Roy Moore.

Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images

In 2003, Alabama judge Roy Moore was removed from office because he insisted on displaying the Ten Commandments in his courthouse. In 2016, he was removed from office again because he refused to enforce the (United States) Supreme Court's ruling on same-sex marriage rights. Now he's running for the Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions—he's probably going to win—and saying stuff like this during campaign events:

We have blacks and whites fighting, reds and yellows fighting, Democrats and Republicans fighting, men and women fighting. What’s going to unite us? What’s going to bring us back together? A president? A Congress? No. It’s going to be God.
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Ironically, one way God could improve white Americans' relationships with Native Americans and Americans of Asian ancestry is by coming down hard on people like Roy Moore who still refer to Native Americans and Americans of Asian ancestry by using racial terms that were already considered insulting and antiquated 50 years ago.

Please smite Roy Moore, God! Do it!

*Correction, Sept. 26: This post originally stated in error that Moore was removed from office because of a dispute over a Ten Commandments monument in his courtroom. The monument was in fact in a public area of the courthouse in which Moore worked.