White supremacist caught on video sucker punching a woman at Berkeley protest.

White Supremacist Caught on Video Sucker Punching a Woman at Berkeley Protest

White Supremacist Caught on Video Sucker Punching a Woman at Berkeley Protest

The Slatest
Your News Companion
April 16 2017 11:43 AM

White Supremacist Caught on Video Sucker Punching a Woman at Berkeley Protest

screen_shot_20170416_at_12.28.10_pm
The moment a man identified as Nathan Damigo punches an unidentified woman at a protest in Berkeley, Calif. on April 15, 2017.

WeAreChange/YouTube

As supporters and opponents of Donald Trump clashed violently in Berkeley, Calif. on Saturday, video of the confrontations quickly made their way to social media showing the two sides exchanging blows and heated words. One particularly shocking video immediately became viral as it showed a Trump supporter delivering a forceful sucker punch to the face of a young woman who seems to have been completely taken by surprise and fell to the ground. Social media users quickly identified the aggressor as Nathan Damigo, founder of white supremacist group Identity Evropa.

The Saturday clashes marked the third time in recent months that Trump supporters and opponents engaged in violent confrontations in Berkeley during what pro-Trump demonstrators had dubbed a “Patriot Day” rally. But counter-protesters showed up. The scene was reminiscent to another confrontation that took place in early March but this time the police was better prepared. Around 250 police officers were deployed to the scene and in the end 21 people were arrested and 11 were injured, including one stabbing victim.

"A large number of fights have occurred and numerous fireworks have been thrown in the crowds," Berkeley police said in a statement. "There have also been numerous reports of pepper spray being used in the crowd."

The violent protests in Berkeley were a sharp contrast to the peaceful protests that took place across the country to demand that Trump release his tax returns.

Daniel Politi has been contributing to Slate since 2004 and wrote the Today’s Papers column from 2006 to 2009. Follow him on Twitter.