Donald Trump casually suggests the U.S. should lead the world into a new nuclear arms race.

Donald Trump Casually Suggests the U.S. Should Lead the World Into a New Nuclear Arms Race

Donald Trump Casually Suggests the U.S. Should Lead the World Into a New Nuclear Arms Race

The Slatest
Your News Companion
Feb. 23 2017 9:02 PM

Donald Trump Casually Suggests the U.S. Should Lead the World Into a New Nuclear Arms Race

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Donald Trump eats a pork chop on a stick at the Iowa State Fair on Aug. 15, 2015, in Des Moines, Iowa.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Donald Trump, after a lifetime of real-estate deals and reality TV show whatever, is now the president of the United States, and as the president, he now gets to have an opinion about things he knows little about, has never shown an interest in, and, unfortunately, affect us all. The latest example of this is Trump’s advocating—in an interview with Reuters Thursday—for the United States to bulk up its nuclear arsenal. Really. “It would be wonderful; a dream would be that no country would have nukes, but if countries are going to have nukes, we’re going to be at the top of the pack,” Trump said. Russia currently has roughly 400 more deployed nuclear warheads than the U.S., which has 1,367 deployed, according to the State Department.

That’s unsettlingly loose rhetoric after decades of careful negotiation to try to limit the supply of nuclear weapons and their potential for use. Trump went one step further during the interview, suggesting that he was dissatisfied with the New START strategic arms–limitation treaty between the U.S. and Russia, which requires both countries to limit their nuclear arsenals to equal levels over the next decade. “The treaty permits both countries to have no more than 800 deployed and non-deployed land-based intercontinental and submarine-launched ballistic missile launchers and heavy bombers equipped to carry nuclear weapons, and contains equal limits on other nuclear weapons,” according to Reuters.

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Trump called the treaty “a one-sided deal” and “another bad deal.” Trump has made similar remarks in favor of nuclear proliferation in the past.

At least in December he was only about to be the leader of the free world, he wasn’t the actual thing yet.

If you were watching a news program, say, three years ago on any station, even Fox News, and a discussion about nuclear proliferation came on, and the anchor turned from his panel of guests and said “let’s bring Donald Trump in on this discussion to get his take on things,” you would have lost your mind. But here we are.