Bernie Sanders campaign suspends two more staffers over data breach.

Sanders Campaign Suspends Two More Staffers Over Data Breach

Sanders Campaign Suspends Two More Staffers Over Data Breach

The Slatest has moved! You can find new stories here.
The Slatest
Your News Companion
Dec. 20 2015 12:49 PM

Sanders Campaign Suspends Two More Staffers Over Data Breach

502025762-democratic-presidential-hopeful-bernie-sanders-arrives
US Democratic Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders arrives on stage to participate in the Democratic Presidential Debate hosted by ABC News at the Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, on December 19, 2015.

Photo by JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

Bernie Sanders’ campaign has suspended two more staffers who are somehow connected to the breach of Hillary Clinton’s voter files. Sanders campaign manager Jeff Weaver first announced the two suspensions to the press after the Democratic debate and the news was confirmed to several news outlets on Sunday morning.

The campaign has refused to name the staffers because they haven’t been fired as “we are still assessing the situation,” communications director Michael Briggs said. “If I fire somebody I’m certainly happy to let you know,” Weaver said, according to Bloomberg. But Weaver said he would not “impugn the character and reputation of these dedicated young people until I know whether somebody’s going to be fired or not.”

Advertisement

The latest suspensions come after the campaign’s national data director, Josh Uretsky, was fired on Friday for his involvement in the incident. Documents suggest that at least four people in the Sanders campaign were involved in the breach that involved improperly accessing Clinton’s files in a database, according to NBC.

The data breach issue was supposed to make Saturday night’s debate a bit more exciting, but Clinton and Sanders seemed eager to patch things up and move on. “The suspense … didn’t last past the first round of questions,” writes Slate’s Josh Voorhees. Sanders explained his side of the story before offering an unequivocal apology to Clinton. "This is not the kind of campaign that we run and if I find anybody else involved in this, they will also be fired," Sanders said. Clinton accepted the apology and said it was time to talk about something else because “I don't think the American people are all that interested in this.”

Daniel Politi has been contributing to Slate since 2004 and wrote the Today’s Papers column from 2006 to 2009. Follow him on Twitter.