Cecil the Lion: variety of activists have angry tweets decrying lack of attention to non-lion causes in wake of hunting dentist story.

Here Are Some Things the Internet Thinks Should Make You Madder Than Cecil the Lion

Here Are Some Things the Internet Thinks Should Make You Madder Than Cecil the Lion

The Slatest
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July 31 2015 12:16 AM

Here Are Some Things the Internet Thinks Should Make You Madder Than Cecil the Lion

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Stuffed animals and angry signs cover the entrance to Dr. Walter Palmer's shuttered dental clinic on July 29, 2015.

Photo by Adam Bettcher/Getty Images

The death of Cecil the lion has turned into the hunt for Walter Palmer as the Minnesota dentist revealed as the beloved lion's killer has gone underground to avoid questions from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the wrath the collective Internet. 

As the vitriol directed at Palmer spread this week, so did expressions of the sentiment that if we could spare the outrage for a beheaded lion, we should be able to spare some outrage for a variety of non-lion things:

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Other animals that have died recently

There are endangered animals at risk all over the world, not least in Africa. Five elephants were killed for their tusks in Kenya, the Washington Post noted, "as the world mourned Cecil the lion."

The animals in need of attention aren't all rare. They might just be prepared rare.

Abortion

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Florida Senator and 2016 presidential hopeful Marco Rubio had something to say about Cecil and some videos he's been watching, and there was no shortage of conservatives chiming in with similar thoughts.

Black Lives Matter

Sandra Bland, Sam DuBose, and others who have died in police custody or as a result of police violence were mentioned by activists as deserving some of the attention directed toward the death of Cecil.*

People in Zimbabwe

As Retuers pointed out Thursday the sentiment stirred by Cecil's death is not shared by many Zimbabweans, and the outpouring of grief is perplexing to people dealing with tough economic and social problems in addition to the occasional threat to life and property by wild animals:

"Why are the Americans more concerned than us?" said Joseph Mabuwa, a 33-year-old father-of-two cleaning his car in the center of the capital. "We never hear them speak out when villagers are killed by lions and elephants in Hwange."

*Correction, July 31, 2015: This post originally misspelled the name of Sam DuBose.