Babies born in Kenya named after Obama visit—including one AirForceOne Obama.

Several Babies Born in Kenya Named After Obama Visit—Including One AirForceOne  

Several Babies Born in Kenya Named After Obama Visit—Including One AirForceOne  

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July 26 2015 6:27 PM

Several Babies Born in Kenya Named After Obama Visit—Including One AirForceOne  

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Named after President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama, newborn babies Obama (right) and Michelle (second from left), are held by their mothers Lucia Kagotha (second from right) and Millicent Akinyo (third from left) at the Mbagathi Hospital in Nairobi on July 26, 2015.

Photo by Ivan Lieman/AFP/Getty Images

It’s an Obama baby boom. President Obama departed Kenya on Sunday and left quite a legacy behind, as more than a couple of babies were named in his honor. Although the name Obama is already relatively common in Kenya, two women decided to name their babies after the president’s jet over the weekend. “I have decided to call my baby AirForceOne Barack Obama so that we can all remember Obama’s visit to Kenya because it is a huge blessing,” one of the mothers tells AFP. Another one decided to simply call her baby “AirForce One.” They were two babies out of eight born on Friday night at one hospital named in honor of Obama. And it wasn’t just boys. One girl was named Michelle, while another was called Malia, and a third Malia Sasha.

In one of the biggest hospitals in Nairobi, at least 10 babies born over the weekend were named after the U.S. president, reports USA Today. “I expect my baby Obama to become a great leader like the U.S. president,” Jael Achieng, who gave birth to her third child on Sunday, said. “I named him after the president because when his plane landed at the airport I found myself in labor and I was rushed to the hospital.”

Daniel Politi has been contributing to Slate since 2004 and wrote the Today’s Papers column from 2006 to 2009. Follow him on Twitter.