Maraschino cherry factory owner caught running marijuana business, commits suicide.

Cherry Factory Owner Commits Suicide After Getting Caught Running Marijuana Business

Cherry Factory Owner Commits Suicide After Getting Caught Running Marijuana Business

The Slatest
Your News Companion
Feb. 26 2015 1:44 PM

Cherry Factory Owner Commits Suicide After Getting Caught Running Marijuana Business

186237473-box-of-the-winning-bid-cherries-are-shown-at-the-2013_1
Cherries.

Photo by Matt King/Getty Images

On Tuesday morning, investigators arrived at Dell's maraschino cherry factory in Brooklyn, New York to investigate reports that workers were dumping hazardous materials into the sewer system. While searching the office of Arthur Mondella, head of Dell's and grandson of the company's founder, investigators discovered a fake wall and, catching a whiff of marijuana, asked Mondella what lay behind it. Mondella asked to be excused to use the bathroom. On his way there, he yelled to his sister to take care of his kids. He then entered the bathroom, removed the handgun he kept strapped to his ankle, and shot himself dead.

What lay behind that wall, it turns out, was marijuana: For years, Mondella had used his cherry factory as a front for a booming weed business. Investigators discovered 80 to 90 pounds of marijuana, $200,000 of cash stuffed in suitcases, and three luxury cars—all stored underground beneath the factory. Apparently, Mondella carried out his drug operation with subtlety; Joe Morrine, the owner of a neighboring business, told reporters he never witnessed a hint of illicit conduct:

Morrine said he never suspected that the warehouse might contain a possible drug operation as authorities alleged.
“It doesn’t make sense that it would be a front; I mean, they’re a legitimate business. They’ve been around for a long time,” Morrine said. “Just a normal business operating; you know, lots of forklifts moving things in and out; nice people.”
Advertisement

Mondella, then, really was a true professional: Forklifts are a notoriously difficult aspect of drug production to master.

Mark Joseph Stern is a writer for Slate. He covers the law and LGBTQ issues.