Amal Clooney seeks meeting with Egypt’s president over jailed journalist.

Amal Clooney Seeks Meeting With Egypt’s President Over Jailed Journalist

Amal Clooney Seeks Meeting With Egypt’s President Over Jailed Journalist

The Slatest
Your News Companion
Feb. 8 2015 2:20 PM

Amal Clooney Seeks Meeting With Egypt’s President Over Jailed Journalist

457197492-lawyer-amal-alamuddin-attends-a-meeting-with-greek
Lawyer Amal Alamuddin on Oct. 14, 2014, in Athens, Greece.

Photo by Thanassis Stavrakis - Pool/Getty Images

Human rights lawyer Amal Clooney is seeking a sit-down with Egypt’s president and foreign minister to press for the release of Al Jazeera reporter Mohamed Fahmy. When Australian reporter Peter Greste was deported on Feb. 1, an official had said Fahmy’s release would be imminent but that has yet to happen.

Nic6342212
Al Jazeera news channel's Mohamed Fadel Fahmy listens to the verdict inside the defendants cage during his trial for allegedly supporting the Muslim Brotherhood on June 23, 2014, at the police institute near Cairo's Tora prison.

Photo by Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

“Since Mr. Greste’s release, Mr. Fahmy's Egyptian counsel has been informed by Egyptian government officials that his release was to follow, and that it was imminent,” Clooney wrote in the letter. “This was to be expected, given that Mr. Fahmy has been the victim of the same injustice as Mr. Greste.”

Advertisement

Fahmy, who was sentenced to seven years in prison, agreed to drop his Egyptian nationality and only keep his Canadian citizenship in order to make deportation easier, notes Daily News Egypt.

Any hope of a quick release though were dashed Sunday with news that a retrial for Fahmy and another Al Jazeera journalist jailed in Egypt will begin on Thursday. "The trial date on Feb. 12 represents our worst nightmare, to have to go through another circus of a retrial," the Fahmy family said in a statement, according to the CBC.

Fahmy’s family harshly criticized the Canadian government saying it had “been let down” by its “conservative approach in handling the case.” The family says that feeling is shared by Egyptians “who are shocked that the Canadian prime minister had not intervened yet to expedite matters.”

Daniel Politi has been contributing to Slate since 2004 and wrote the Today’s Papers column from 2006 to 2009. Follow him on Twitter.