Hillary Clinton and Ben Bernanke Are All Aboard the Post-Public-Service Gravy Train

The Slatest
Your News Companion by Ben Mathis-Lilley
May 21 2014 2:41 PM

Hillary Clinton and Ben Bernanke Are All Aboard the Post-Public-Service Gravy Train

490382219-former-u-s-secretary-of-state-hillary-clinton-addresses
Clinton at a recent event.

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Separate reports in Mother Jones and the New York Times today about Hillary Clinton and former Federal Reserve chair Ben Bernanke demonstrate (again) that working in the United States government can be as much a public service as it is a prelude to a lucrative career as a corporate speaker. From MoJo:

Since leaving State, Clinton has made more than 90 speeches and notable appearances. Her hosts have included private equity firms, investment banks, nonprofit galas, trade association conventions, and a slew of colleges and universities. At least two-dozen of those were paid speeches. With her usual fee of $200,000 a speech, Clinton has banked close to $5 million for her speeches and appearances in the last 15 months.
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And from the Times:

During his eight years as steward of the world’s largest economy, Mr. Bernanke’s salary was about $200,000 a year. Now he makes that in just a few hours speaking to bankers, hedge fund billionaires and leaders of industry. This year alone, he is poised to make millions of dollars from speaking engagements.

Clinton has been paid by, among others, Goldman Sachs, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, and the Carlyle Group—major institutions she would deal with if, as she hopes, she becomes president in 2016—while, according to the Times, Bernanke's comments at private events sometimes influence the decisions of investors who believe that his statements also reflect the views of current Fed chair Janet Yellen.

Ben Mathis-Lilley edits the Slatest. Follow @Slatest on Twitter.

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