Colo. Symphony's Plan to Lure Younger Audiences—Make Performances “Bring Your Own Cannabis”

Your News Companion by Ben Mathis-Lilley
April 30 2014 7:53 PM

Colo. Symphony Launches “Classically Cannabis: The High Note Series” of Concerts to Attract Younger Audience

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Colorado Symphony Orchestra's plan to lure younger audience: just add pot.

Photo by MIKE THEILER/AFP/Getty Images

Young people, history confirms, like smoking pot. Classical music, however, hasn’t quite caught on among this demographic. But, perhaps that’s because they’re marketing it wrong?

That’s what the Colorado Symphony Orchestra is hoping. To try to revive its dwindling fortunes, which includes flagging attendance and funding, the state’s orchestra is launching a pot-inspired “Classically Cannabis: The High Note Series." Think Dark Side of the Moon with a string section. "The cannabis industry obviously opens the door even further to a younger, more diverse audience," symphony CEO Jerome Kern told the Associated Press. The concert deal, however, isn’t a one way street. In return for the entrée into a younger audience that “BYOC” (Bring Your Own Cannabis) concerts can provide, the marijuana-related companies get "the legitimacy of being associated with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra." Kern said.

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Here’s more on the cannabis concert tour from the AP:

The first three shows will feature small ensembles of symphony players at a downtown Denver gallery. The series culminates with a concert at Red Rocks, an amphitheater outside Denver where the symphony and pop and rock groups play. Jane West, whose Edible Events Co. is organizing the series, said concertgoers will be able to smoke pot in a separate area at the gallery. Guests must be at least 21 and purchase $75 tickets in advance.

Elliot Hannon is a writer in Washington, D.C. Follow him on Twitter.

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