GM Recalls Another 1.3 Million Cars, Some For the Second Time

Your News Companion by Ben Mathis-Lilley
March 31 2014 5:17 PM

GM Recalls Another 1.3 Million Cars, Some For the Second Time

98307214-fading-general-motors-co-logo-is-painted-on-a-wall-above
A fading General Motors Co. logo is painted on a wall above a car dealership on April 7, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

General Motors announced on Monday that its recall woes are not yet over as the automaker issues a recall for an additional 1.3 million vehicles because they may suddenly lose their power steering, according to the company. The announcement of the ever-expanding recall comes on the heels of a weekend announcement by GM that the company had already recalled a whopping 4.8 million vehicles so far this year. The latest round of problems for the carmaker also comes a day before GM CEO Mary Barra is scheduled to testify before Congress about why it’s taken GM so long to recall cars with faulty ignition switches. The problem was first spotted in 2001 and has been linked to 13 deaths.

Here’s more from General Motors on what Monday’s recall covers:

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  • Chevrolet Malibu: All model year 2004 and 2005, and some model year 2006 and model year 2008 and 2009 vehicles
  • Chevrolet Malibu Maxx: All model year 2004 and 2005, and some 2006 model year
  • Chevrolet HHR (Non-Turbo): Some model year 2009 and 2010 vehicles
  • Chevrolet Cobalt: Some model year 2010 vehicles
  • Saturn Aura: Some model year 2008 and 2009 vehicles
  • Saturn ION: All model year 2004 to 2007 vehicles
  • Pontiac G6: All model year 2005, and some model year 2006 and model year 2008 and 2009 vehicles
  • Service parts installed into certain vehicles before May 31, 2010 under a previous safety recall  

Astonishingly, some of these cars have already been recalled by GM. “We have recalled some of these vehicles before for the same issue and offered extended warranties on others, but we did not do enough,” GM vice president for Global Vehicle Safety, Jeff Boyer, said in a statement.

Elliot Hannon is a writer in Washington, D.C. Follow him on Twitter.

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