Report: Canada Gave Green Light for NSA to Spy at 2010 G20 Summit

Your News Companion by Ben Mathis-Lilley
Nov. 28 2013 1:10 PM

Report: Canada Gave Green Light for NSA to Spy at 2010 G20 Summit

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Leaders from around the world pose for the G20 Summit "family photograph" on June 27, 2010 in Toronto

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The latest batch of documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden shows that the Canadian government allowed the United States to carry out “widespread surveillance” in Canada during the 2010 G8 and G20 summits, the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. revealed. Documents marked “Top Secret” show how the United States turned its embassy in Ottawa into a security command post during a six-day spying operation.

Despite the secretive nature of the operation, it “was no secret to Canadian authorities,” notes the report in which Glenn Greenwald, the former Guardian journalist who first broke the Snowden story, is one of the three bylines. One of the documents refers to how the agency´s plans were "closely co-ordinated with the Canadian partner.” The documents do not specify the targets of the espionage. Still, it looks like the latest evidence that the NSA spied on governments that are supposed to be United States allies, a revelation that has already caused diplomatic rifts with several countries, including Germany and Brazil.

Daniel Politi has been contributing to Slate since 2004 and wrote the "Today's Papers" column from 2006 to 2009. You can follow him on Twitter @dpoliti.

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