Greenwald's Latest: NSA Collected U.S. Email Records in Bulk for a Decade

The Slatest
Your News Companion by Ben Mathis-Lilley
June 27 2013 11:37 AM

Greenwald's Latest: NSA Collected U.S. Email Records in Bulk for a Decade

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General Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Agency, testifies before the House Select Intelligence Committee June 18, 2013 in Washington, D.C.

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Drip, drip, drip. The latest from Glenn Greenwald and the Guardian:

Josh Voorhees Josh Voorhees

Josh Voorhees is a Slate senior writer. He lives in Iowa City. 

The Obama administration for more than two years permitted the National Security Agency to continue collecting vast amounts of records detailing the email and internet usage of Americans, according to secret documents obtained by the Guardian.
The documents indicate that under the program, launched in 2001, a federal judge sitting on the secret surveillance panel called the Fisa court would approve a bulk collection order for internet metadata "every 90 days". A senior administration official confirmed the program, stating that it ended in 2011. The collection of these records began under the Bush administration's wide-ranging warrantless surveillance program, collectively known by the NSA codename Stellar Wind.
According to a top-secret draft report by the NSA's inspector general – published for the first time today by the Guardian – the agency began "collection of bulk internet metadata" involving "communications with at least one communicant outside the United States or for which no communicant was known to be a citizen of the United States".
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You can go check out the full report here. Slate will have more on the latest revelations later.

Read more on Slate about the NSA’s secret snooping programs, and follow @JoshVoorhees and the rest of the @slatest team on Twitter.

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