Poll: Majority Still Opposes Obamacare

Your News Companion by Ben Mathis-Lilley
May 27 2013 11:00 AM

Three Years Later, Majority of Americans Still Oppose Obamacare

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A man has his glucose level checked in Los Angeles, California

Photo by David McNew/Getty Images

Three years after becoming law, Americans really haven’t changed their mind on the nation’s health care overhaul championed by President Obama. A new CNN/ORC International poll shows that 54 percent say they oppose the law popularly known as Obamacare, a figure that has mostly remained unchanged since 2010. But that number is a bit misleading because 16 percent say they oppose the measure because it doesn’t go far enough, while 35 percent say they oppose the law because it’s too liberal. Meanwhile, 43 percent say they support the health care law, a number that has also remained largely unchanged since 2010, notes CNN.

Younger Americans are more likely to support the law that also wins majority support in urban areas. "Not surprisingly, the Obama coalition is most supportive of Obamacare," CNN Polling Director Keating Holland said. Considering the continuing controversy of the law, it seems evident that Republicans will be pushing Obamacare as a key issue in next year’s elections. Although the law has already been a feature of the last two election seasons, next year will be different because the plan will become a reality and voters will be able to vote on how they see the program working and not just the theory, points out the Associated Press.

Daniel Politi has been contributing to Slate since 2004 and wrote the "Today's Papers" column from 2006 to 2009. You can follow him on Twitter @dpoliti.