FBI Hasn't Interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev's Widow Yet

Your News Companion by Ben Mathis-Lilley
April 22 2013 9:56 AM

Tamerlan Tsarnaev's Widow Isn't Ready to Talk to the FBI Yet

167006476
Tamerlan Tsarnaev (right) and Lamar Fenner (left) stand during a decision in the 201-pound division boxing match during the 2009 Golden Gloves National Tournament of Champions in 2009 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Photo by Glenn DePriest/Getty Images

Federal authorities are still waiting to interview Katherine Russell Tsarnaev, the wife of Tamerlan Tsarnaev and the mother of his 3-year-old daughter. Her lawyer tells the Associated Press that officers showed up at the Rhode Island home of her parents Sunday night but she declined to speak with them. "I spoke to them, and that’s all I can say right now," attorney Amato DeLuca said before going on to paint the latest brush strokes in the still-developing picture of Tamerlan Tsarnaev in the days before the Boston Marathon bombing. Here's the Associated Press with the relevant details:

DeLuca also offered new details on Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s movements in the days after the bombings, saying the last day he was alive that ‘‘he was home’’ when his wife left for work. When asked whether anything seemed amiss to his wife following the bombings, DeLuca responded, ‘‘Not as far as I know.’’ He said she learned her husband was a suspect in the bombings by seeing it on TV. He would not elaborate.
DeLuca said his client did not suspect her husband of anything, and that there was no reason for her to have suspected him. He said she had been working 70 to 80 hours, seven days a week as a home health care aide. While she was at work, her husband cared for their toddler daughter, DeLuca said. "When this allegedly was going on, she was working, and had been working all week to support her family,’" he told the AP.
Advertisement

According to DeLuca, Katherine Russell Tsarnaev, now 24, was a student at Suffolk University in Boston when her friends first introduced her to Tamerlan at a nightlclub. They then dated on and off again before marrying in either 2009 or 2010, he said. At some point she converted from Christianity to Islam.

***Follow @JoshVoorhees and the rest of the @slatest team on Twitter, and read more on Slate about the Boston Marathon bombing.***

Josh Voorhees is a Slate senior writer. He lives in Iowa City. 

TODAY IN SLATE

Foreigners

More Than Scottish Pride

Scotland’s referendum isn’t about nationalism. It’s about a system that failed, and a new generation looking to take a chance on itself. 

What Charles Barkley Gets Wrong About Corporal Punishment and Black Culture

Why Greenland’s “Dark Snow” Should Worry You

Three Talented Actresses in Three Terrible New Shows

Why Do Some People See the Virgin Mary in Grilled Cheese?

The science that explains the human need to find meaning in coincidences.

Jurisprudence

Happy Constitution Day!

Too bad it’s almost certainly unconstitutional.

Is It Worth Paying Full Price for the iPhone 6 to Keep Your Unlimited Data Plan? We Crunch the Numbers.

What to Do if You Literally Get a Bug in Your Ear

  News & Politics
Weigel
Sept. 16 2014 7:03 PM Kansas Secretary of State Loses Battle to Protect Senator From Tough Race
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 16 2014 4:16 PM The iPhone 6 Marks a Fresh Chance for Wireless Carriers to Kill Your Unlimited Data
  Life
The Eye
Sept. 16 2014 12:20 PM These Outdoor Cat Shelters Have More Style Than the Average Home
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 15 2014 3:31 PM My Year As an Abortion Doula
  Slate Plus
Slate Plus Video
Sept. 16 2014 2:06 PM A Farewell From Emily Bazelon The former senior editor talks about her very first Slate pitch and says goodbye to the magazine.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 16 2014 8:43 PM This 17-Minute Tribute to David Fincher Is the Perfect Preparation for Gone Girl
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 16 2014 6:40 PM This iPhone 6 Feature Will Change Weather Forecasting
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 17 2014 7:30 AM Ring Around the Rainbow
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 15 2014 9:05 PM Giving Up on Goodell How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.