Malala Yousufzai: teenage education activist flown from Pakistan to UK for medical treatment after Taliban shooting.

Teenage Pakistani Activist Flown to U.K. 

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Oct. 15 2012 11:31 AM

Teenage Pakistani Activist Flown to U.K. for Medical Treatment

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Pakistani youths shouts slogans during a protest against the assassination attempt by Taliban on child activist Malala Yousafzai in Lahore on October 15, 2012

Photo by Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images.

Malala Yousufzai, the 14-year-old Pakistani activist who was shot by the Taliban last week, has flown to the U.K. for medical treatment.

Yousufzai was shot in the head last Tuesday on her way home from school. Doctors surgically removed the bullet from her head last week, and she's been recovering but critical since then.

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According to ABC News, the Pakistani government is paying for all of Yousufzai's medical expenses. She was flown to the UK on Monday morning via an air ambulance donated by the United Arab Emirates. While she is reportedly responding well to treatment, Yousufzai has been dependent on a ventilator to breathe and has been kept under medical sedation since the shooting. The Pakistani military released a statement saying the teenager would be treated in the U.K. for head and neck injuries, and will require "long term rehabilitation."

Last Friday, Pakistan observed a day of prayer for the teenager, who was an outspoken activist and blogger for girls' education. The Taliban targeted her for challenging them on the issue. For more on Yousufzai and the context around the shooting, see William Dobson's excellent piece over at XX Factor

Abby Ohlheiser is a Slate contributor.

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