Candy Crush Saga office: Adolfsson & Partners design a wildly playful office for King in Stockholm. (PHOTOS.)

Of Course the Candy Crush Office Has a “Magic Forest Room” and a “Treasure Island”

Of Course the Candy Crush Office Has a “Magic Forest Room” and a “Treasure Island”

The Eye
Slate’s design blog.
April 2 2015 9:02 AM

Of Course the Candy Crush Office Has a “Magic Forest Room” and a “Treasure Island”

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Just your average conference room in the Stockholm offices of King, the mobile game developer behind the Candy Crush Saga. The offices were inspired by the company’s nearly 200 games and were designed by Stockholm-based firm Adolfsson & Partners.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

The look of real-life office spaces of popular tech companies is as much about branding in the image-driven online world as it is about making employees happy. Tech company office design seems to fall into two camps. First there are the neo-industrial, neutral-toned, faux-spontaneous setups that are all about raw materials and open, flexible, blank spaces to foster creativity and collaboration, like Airbnb’s San Francisco office. And on the opposite side of the spectrum are the over-the-top theme offices that read like real-life technicolor fantasies of preschools inhabited by kids of all ages, such as the whimsical London office of mobile kids game developer Mind Candy.

Perhaps it’s no surprise that the new Stockholm offices of games developer King, the makers of the guilty pleasure that is Candy Crush Saga, fall into the latter camp. Designed by Swedish firm Adolfsson & Partners (the group behind Spotify’s Stockholm office), the space is a wildly cartoonish assault on the senses.

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King’s Pavilion Park is the company’s biggest shared meeting space, a party room inspired by Sweden’s traditional “people’s parks” combined with a touch of the fair.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

Adolfsson & Partners says in a project description that they were inspired by the “fun” and “magic” of King’s nearly 200 games. “With an ambition to bring King’s world of games and characters to life,” they write, “we created a colorful and energy-filled office featuring both humor and intelligent solutions.”

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The overstimulating design strikes terror in my introverted heart, but I can't help finding it riveting nonetheless, with its 10 themed areas, color-coded wayfinding carpet, and flexible workstations for individuals and teams, plus an embarrassment of play spaces and meeting rooms of every imaginable configuration wired with the latest technology and video conferencing between King's offices around the world.

“We didn’t build an office,” the designers write. “We created a kingdom.”

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Pavilion Park.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

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The area known as Sandy Dunes.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

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The Countryside section of the King offices.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

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King game room.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

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King workshop.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

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The King library.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

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King's magic forest room.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

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The office is divided into 10 areas differentiated by color and theme.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

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Upper Kingtown is “a meeting place for everyone and a space for playing, lounging about in the sofas or chillaxing in the giant hammocks,” the designers say.

Photo by Joachim Belaieff

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The Green Hills section of the King offices include cubicles with flexible custom-made furniture and space for plant pots.

Photo by Kristian Pohl

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The office area known as Treasure Island.

Photo by Kristian Pohl

Kristin Hohenadel's writing on design has appeared in publications including the New York Times, Fast Company, Vogue, Elle Decor, Lonny, and Apartment Therapy.