Jewelry for Your Camera? Why Not!

Slate’s design blog.
Dec. 23 2013 9:00 AM

Photographer Todd Selby Makes Jewelry for Your Camera

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Camera jewelry by Todd Selby and William Eadon

Courtesy of The Selby

The Selby, photographer Todd Selby’s cult website, is a voyeuristic glimpse into the private lives of the international creative set, who offer inside peeks at their highly curated living and work spaces.

Just in time for Christmas, Selby has branched out into retail with a limited edition camera accessories capsule collection for his new accessories company Selbz. Selby collaborated with a half dozen brands and artists on a high-end range of photography-related accessories that include wraps, bags, tassels, reflectors, memory card holders, and blingy “camera jewelry” that looks like a cross between a mood ring and a bindi. It attaches to the top of your camera where a flash would (and might just give someone another reason to steal your gear).

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Camera jewelry from William Eadon and Todd Selby

Courtesy of The Selby

In case you are now asking, "Camera jewelry: Why?" Selby's answer can be boiled down to, "Why not?"

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"Camera accessories are usually pretty dull so I wanted to flair them up,” Selby wrote in an email. “The idea of the camera jewelry came about as I haven't used a flash in over five years and thought there must be another way to bling out that ugly slot on my camera other than with a flash. I did a film with crystal expert William Eadon a while back and tapped him to help me create this camera jewelry line. We spent time carefully choosing all the stones which all have to do with perception."

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Camera jewelry from Toddy Selby and William Eadon

Courtesy of The Selby

A guide to the crystals explains, for example, that citrine is “a happy stone which brightens everyone’s day” and is “one of the best all around stones to use on a shoot;” green amethyst “is the best stone to be working with when you need to change up the energy on any given shoot.”

Selby says the overall design strategy for the new brand is “based on the concept that everything important needs the right amount of wrong.” He wrote: "I just like things to be colorful and have a sense of humor about them.”