Screaming "Tiger Mother" Explains Why She Is a Better Parent Than You (So Far)

Screaming "Tiger Mother" Explains Why She Is a Better Parent Than You (So Far)

Screaming "Tiger Mother" Explains Why She Is a Better Parent Than You (So Far)

A blog about politics, sports, media, stuff
Jan. 10 2011 9:15 AM

Screaming "Tiger Mother" Explains Why She Is a Better Parent Than You (So Far)

There are many, many bizarre and debatable notions in the

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that Yale law professor Amy Chua published in Saturday's Wall Street Journal, in which she argued that screaming at one's children to do drill work and depriving them of entertainment or social contact with their peers are the secrets to why Chinese people raise smarter and more successful children than regular decadent Americans do. A working-class Jamaican-immigrant mother, for instance—who would be an honorary "Chinese mother," according to Chua—might be surprised to learn that good, hard parenting means spending a week at the piano, going "right through dinner into the night," threatening and yelling at a seven-year-old girl to force her to learn a difficult piano part. Not everybody's boss gives out flex time as readily as Yale Law does.



But mostly, as with so many child-rearing success stories, the biggest question Chua raises is: what makes you so sure you've succeeded? God bless Chua's daughters, but according to some simple arithmetic and the pictures accompanying the Journal piece, they're considerably younger than, say, 60. Or 40. Or even 25. There's plenty of time yet to find out what fruit all those years of rigorous "Chinese" alpha parenting—no sleepovers with friends, Chua brags, no personally chosen extracurriculars, no musical instruments other than piano and violin (sorry, Yo-Yo Ma; your parents

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weren't Chinese enough

)—will really bear. Marv Marinovich

, either. Discipline and high standards, all the way. "I don't know if you can be a great success without being a fanatic," was how he put it.

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Or as his son said,  two decades later, looking back on the

, "The environment plays a part in it, for sure."