Why Does Superman Bother Rescuing People?

A blog about business and economics.
June 16 2013 7:48 PM

Is Rescuing People From Dangerous Accidents Really a Good Use of Superman's Time?

170433010
Lois Lane has some tough questions about Superman's priorities.

Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images

I don't want to offer spoilers for the new Superman movie, Man of Steel, but suffice it to say that for a while in the film Superman is kind of bouncing around sporadically rescuing people from random accidents. And it's a Superman scenario we all know and love. Even when humanity's existence isn't being threatened by alien invaders or the latest evil Lex Luthor plot there's always someone, somewhere who needs to be saved by a guy who can lift really heavy objects.

And yet is this a good use of Superman's time?

Advertisement

What we're talking about, essentially, is the world's greatest solar power cell. The earth's yellow sun gives his eyes the ability to boil water, and his arms and legs can exert enormous amounts of force. In other words, he could be rigging up a plan to generate enormous quantities of pollution-free electricity! In the longer term, I'm pretty confident that solar power technology is going to improve to the point where we don't need Superman to play this role. But for the moment, Superman could take an enormous bite out of a world problem that's much more significant than the occasional plane crash or factory explosion. The world needs cheaper energy and the world needs cleaner energy, and Superman could be delivering it.

UPDATE: Apparently I'm not the first person to think along these lines.

Matthew Yglesias is the executive editor of Vox and author of The Rent Is Too Damn High.

TODAY IN SLATE

History

Slate Plus Early Read: The Self-Made Man

The story of America’s most pliable, pernicious, irrepressible myth.

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada. Now, Journalists Can’t Even Say Her Name.

Mitt Romney May Be Weighing a 2016 Run. That Would Be a Big Mistake.

Amazing Photos From Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution

Transparent Is the Fall’s Only Great New Show

The XX Factor

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada

Now, journalists can't even say her name.

Doublex

Lena Dunham, the Book

More shtick than honesty in Not That Kind of Girl.

What a Juicy New Book About Diane Sawyer and Katie Couric Fails to Tell Us About the TV News Business

Does Your Child Have Sluggish Cognitive Tempo? Or Is That Just a Disorder Made Up to Scare You?

  News & Politics
History
Sept. 29 2014 11:45 PM The Self-Made Man The story of America’s most pliable, pernicious, irrepressible myth.
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 29 2014 7:01 PM We May Never Know If Larry Ellison Flew a Fighter Jet Under the Golden Gate Bridge
  Life
Dear Prudence
Sept. 30 2014 6:00 AM Drive-By Bounty Prudie advises a woman whose boyfriend demands she flash truckers on the highway.
  Double X
Doublex
Sept. 29 2014 11:43 PM Lena Dunham, the Book More shtick than honesty in Not That Kind of Girl.
  Slate Plus
Slate Fare
Sept. 29 2014 8:45 AM Slate Isn’t Too Liberal, but … What readers said about the magazine’s bias and balance.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 29 2014 9:06 PM Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice Looks Like a Comic Masterpiece
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 30 2014 7:36 AM Almost Humane What sci-fi can teach us about our treatment of prisoners of war.
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 30 2014 7:30 AM What Lurks Beneath The Methane Lakes of Titan?
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 28 2014 8:30 PM NFL Players Die Young. Or Maybe They Live Long Lives. Why it’s so hard to pin down the effects of football on players’ lives.