Sleep-Tracking Device Shows How the Napa Earthquake Woke People Up

The Citizen's Guide to the Future
Aug. 25 2014 1:30 PM

Sleep-Tracking Device Shows How the Napa Earthquake Woke People Up

454076406-debris-sits-on-the-ground-in-front-of-a-damaged
NAPA, CA - AUGUST 24: Debris sits on the ground in front of a damaged building following a reported 6.0 earthquake on August 24, 2014 in Napa, California. A 6.0 earthquake rocked the San Francisco Bay Area shortly after 3:00 am on Sunday morning causing damage to buildings and sending at least 70 people to a hospital with non-life threatening injuries. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The South Napa Earthquake—the strongest in Northern California in the last quarter-century—was quite a shake up. And for many, it was also quite the wake up, since it struck at 3:20 a.m. Pacific time.

But for how many? To answer that question, the data scientists at the wearables company Jawbone turned to its UP users. Jawbone’s website describes UP as “a revolutionary system that guides you every step of the way to a better, healthier you” by tracking diet, exercise—and sleep. Jawbone turned to its sleep-tracking UP users to find out how, exactly, the earthquake affected sleep.

Advertisement

They found that while hardly any users between 75 and 100 miles from the epicenter awoke, 55 percent of those in Oakland and San Francisco did. And in Napa, Sonoma, Vallejo, and Fairfield, 93 percent of users were shaken awake when the earthquake hit—and 45 percent of them were awake for the rest of the night. Sweet dreams are not made of this. 

FT-140825-Jawbone

Chart courtesy of Jawbone

Future Tense is a partnership of SlateNew America, and Arizona State University.

Emily Tamkin is an editorial intern at Slate and a M.Phil. candidate in Russian and East European studies at Oxford. Follow her on Twitter.  

TODAY IN SLATE

Medical Examiner

The Most Terrifying Thing About Ebola 

The disease threatens humanity by preying on humanity.

I Bought the Huge iPhone. I’m Already Thinking of Returning It.

Scotland Is Just the Beginning. Expect More Political Earthquakes in Europe.

Students Aren’t Going to College Football Games as Much Anymore

And schools are getting worried.

Two Damn Good, Very Different Movies About Soldiers Returning From War

The XX Factor

Lifetime Didn’t Think the Steubenville Rape Case Was Dramatic Enough

So they added a little self-immolation.

Politics

Blacks Don’t Have a Corporal Punishment Problem

Americans do. But when blacks exhibit the same behaviors as others, it becomes part of a greater black pathology. 

Why a Sketch of Chelsea Manning Is Stirring Up Controversy

How Worried Should Poland, the Baltic States, and Georgia Be About a Russian Invasion?

Trending News Channel
Sept. 19 2014 1:11 PM Watch Flashes of Lightning Created in a Lab  
  News & Politics
Weigel
Sept. 20 2014 11:13 AM -30-
  Business
Business Insider
Sept. 20 2014 6:30 AM The Man Making Bill Gates Richer
  Life
Quora
Sept. 20 2014 7:27 AM How Do Plants Grow Aboard the International Space Station?
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 19 2014 4:58 PM Steubenville Gets the Lifetime Treatment (And a Cheerleader Erupts Into Flames)
  Slate Plus
Slate Picks
Sept. 19 2014 12:00 PM What Happened at Slate This Week? The Slatest editor tells us to read well-informed skepticism, media criticism, and more.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 20 2014 3:21 PM “The More You Know (About Black People)” Uses Very Funny PSAs to Condemn Black Stereotypes
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 19 2014 6:31 PM The One Big Problem With the Enormous New iPhone
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 21 2014 8:00 AM An Astronaut’s Guided Video Tour of Earth
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 18 2014 11:42 AM Grandmaster Clash One of the most amazing feats in chess history just happened, and no one noticed.