This 23-Ton Star Wars X-Wing Is the Largest Lego Model Ever Built

Future Tense
The Citizen's Guide to the Future
May 24 2013 3:07 PM

This 23-Ton Star Wars X-Wing Is the Largest Lego Model Ever Built

The world's largest Lego model is on display at Times Square in New York.
The world's largest Lego model is on display at Times Square in New York.

Photo by Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

The world's largest Lego model, a 45,000-pound Star Wars X-Wing starfighter, is just sort of sitting in New York's Times Square right now.

It was assembled by a team of 32 people over the course of 17,000 man-hours in Kladno, Czech Republic, on what one assumes was the world's largest living-room floor. The X-Wing comprises 5.3 million Lego bricks, some 2 million more than the previous title-holder, a robot at Minnesota's Mall of America. At 43 feet from front to back, it's actually two feet longer than than the fictional X-Wing that Luke Skywalker flew into battle in the original Star Wars movie.

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The model will remain in Times Square through Saturday before being packed up and shipped to Legoland in Carlsbad, California.

“It has a steel infrastructure that’s built to the seismic code for Carlsbad,” master builder Erik Varszegi told Businessweek. “It’s really the same design as the retail set, but at 42 times the scale.”

The White House last year staunchly refused to build a Death Star despite a popular online petition to do so, citing budget constraints and an estimated cost of roughly $850 gajillion. But perhaps someone could at least build a life-size Lego Death Star so the Lego X-Wing will have something to blow up. Everyone knows the best part of playing Legos is at the end when you crash them into each other and send the pieces flying all over the room.

LEGO X-Wing in Times Square
The Lego X-Wing is 11 feet tall, 43 feet long, and has a 44-foot wingspan.

Photo by Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

The model was transported to New York from Europe in 32 sections via container ship.
The model was transported to New York from Europe in 32 sections via container ship.

Photo by Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Future Tense is a partnership of SlateNew America, and Arizona State University.

Will Oremus is Slate's senior technology writer.

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