What’s Missing From Google’s “Project Glass” Concept Video? Ads!

The Citizen's Guide to the Future
April 5 2012 1:52 PM

What’s Missing From Google’s “Project Glass” Concept Video? Ads!

We’ve got another spoof of Google’s augmented-reality glasses, which the company first publicly revealed yesterday. The Project Glass announcement came complete with a concept video showing a New Yorker going through his day, his spiffy specs helping him along the way: alerting him when the subway line is down, letting him know a lady friend wants to meet up, and guiding him to ukulele instruction guides at a bookstore.

Self-described “pop culture hacker” Jonathan McIntosh noticed that something was missing from this little spot: the ads. So McIntosh took portions of the original Google video and commercialized them. Watch:

Advertisement

In the video description, McIntosh notes:

All of the AdWords used are actual Google ad returns found via Google searches based on the dialog, situation or setting in the original video. Yes "Music, Stop!" does actually return an ad asking if you would like to listen to music. 

This may not be too far from reality. In late February, writing about the then-rumored Google glasses on Extreme Tech, Sebastian Anthony wrote:

Remember, Google is ultimately an advertising company, where eyeballs directly translate into money — and it’s hard to get any closer to your eyes than a pair of augmented reality glasses. When you look at a car dealership, Google will be able to display ads from a competitor. When you sit in front of a computer, or TV, or stare through a shop window, the glasses will be able to track your head movements and report back on the efficacy of display ads. Perhaps most excitingly, when you read a newspaper or book or other static medium, Google could even overlay its own, interactive ads.

Future Tense is a partnership of SlateNew America, and Arizona State University.

Torie Bosch is the editor of Future Tense, a project of Slate, the New America Foundation, and Arizona State that looks at the implications of new technologies. 

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