FBI: Navy Yard Shooter Aaron Alexis May Have Thought He Was Controlled by Electromagnetic Waves

A blog about murder, theft, and other wickedness.
Sept. 25 2013 3:01 PM

FBI: Navy Yard Shooter Aaron Alexis May Have Thought He Was Controlled by Electromagnetic Waves

On Wednesday, the FBI released several pieces of new information about its investigation into last week’s shooting at the Washington, D.C. Navy Yard. Josh Voorhees at The Slatest already spotlighted a new video of shooter Aaron Alexis stalking the halls of Navy Yard Building #197, shotgun in hand.

The FBI also released several still photographs pertaining to the investigation, including one photo of the messages Alexis apparently etched into the side of his shotgun.

elfweapon
Some of the messages etched into the side of Aaron Alexis' shotgun.

Federal Bureau of Investigation

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Notice the message that reads “My ELF weapon.” Last week, the Washington Post speculated that message was a reference to “extremely low frequency” electromagnetic waves, and suggested a possible connection with Alexis’ pre-shooting complaint that unknown people were “using ‘some sort of microwave machine’ to send vibrations into his body, preventing him from falling asleep.” On Wednesday, the FBI validated that theory:

There are multiple indicators that Alexis held a delusional belief that he was being controlled or influenced by extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves. The etching of “My ELF weapon!” on the left side of the receiver of the Remington 870 shotgun is believed to reference these electromagnetic waves. In addition, a document retrieved from his electronic media stated, “Ultra low frequency attack is what I’ve been subject to for the last 3 months, and to be perfectly honest that is what has driven me to this.”
ELF technology was a legitimate program for naval sub-tonal submarine communications; however, conspiracy theories exist which misinterpret its application as the weaponization of remote neural frequencies for government monitoring and manipulation of unsuspecting citizens.

The feeling that one is being singled out for persecution by outside forces is a common paranoid delusion.

Justin Peters is a writer for Slate. He is working on a book about Aaron Swartz, copyright, and the rise of “free culture.” Email him at justintrevett@fastmail.fm.

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