Scottish People Are Selling Their Independence Votes on eBay

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Aug. 30 2014 7:18 AM

Scots Are Selling Their Independence Votes on eBay

Thousands of pro-independence campaigners attend a rally on Calton Hill on Sept. 21,2013, in Edinburgh, Scotland.
These Scots’ votes are not for sale.

Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

This article originally appeared in Business Insider.

Police in Scotland are investigating the sale of votes for the country’s Sept. 18 independence referendum on eBay after multiple votes were listed online in recent weeks, Scottish Television reports.

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One seller from Glasgow sold his vote for £1.04 (about $1.72) and promised to vote however the winning bidder wished.

An eBay seller from the Scottish borders listed his vote on eBay with a starting bid of £10.00 (about $16.50). The seller claimed that the sale price of the vote would be donated to charity. It was removed from the site after STV contacted the police and the Electoral Commission.

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Screenshot of eBay via STV

One eBay seller explained why he was selling his vote online, including in the eBay listing, “This is my very own unique piece of British History! It is my personal YES or NO vote for the upcoming Scottish Referendum in September. I for one, do not give a flying monkeys about any of this. This could be the deciding vote. Who knows? I am a hard working Scottish citizen with a house, a gorgeous wife and two beautiful kids who are my world. This vote will not change anything in our lives so I have decided not to vote my opinion but instead..... ONE OF YOURS! Happy Bidding”

In a statement to STV, Police Scotland confirmed that it was investigating the sale of referendum votes on eBay: “Our policing arrangements for the referendum are well in hand and will be appropriate and proportionate. Police Scotland’s priority is to ensure public safety and security. We will respond appropriately to any issues which arise. We are investigating these incidents and therefore cannot comment on the outcome of these incidents until all inquires are concluded. Where other incidents are reported they will be investigated and appropriate action taken.”

On Sept. 18 Scotland will vote on whether to remain part of the United Kingdom. A recent poll showed growing support for Scottish independence, with 47 percent of survey respondents indicating that they would vote yes to independence.

James Cook is a European technology reporter for Business Insider.

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