What It’s Like to Ditch Your iPhone for a Cellphone From 2004

Analyzing the top news stories across the web
July 5 2014 7:21 AM

Gizmodo Writer Trades Her iPhone for a 2004 Motorola Razr

A cellphone from 2001.
It was a different time.

Photo by Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images

This post originally appeared in Business Insider.

Anyone born before 2007 already knows the answer, but it’s hard to imagine what life today would look like without our smartphones by our side. For something that hasn’t even been around for 10 years, we as a society have grown extremely attached to the little pocket computers we’d simply feel lost without.

Advertisement

Gizmodo writer Ashley Feinberg wanted to know the feeling firsthand, so the twentysomething New Yorker ditched her iPhone for 30 days and instead, picked up a 2004 Motorola Razr, a coveted phone from the early aughts. 

She wrote about her month sans iPhone here, and it’s a great read. We pulled some of the most interesting anecdotes from Feinberg’s experience.

Here’s what she didn’t realize she’d miss about her smartphone:

Maps

“In retrospect this is obvious, but I hadn’t even considered the fact that my Razr wouldn’t have access to a maps app,” Feinberg wrote, noting that she doesn’t even own a printer to obtain directions from old favorite MapQuest.

She had people draw directions on paper for her. 

The Camera

I spent an inordinate amount of time trying to bring these 1.3 megapixel wonders into the modern world. During my quest, I found multiple message boards with people bewailing similar problems, and they’d found solutions! My problem was solved, is something I would say were it 2009. Because as far as I can tell, that is the last time someone successfully got photos off a Razr V3 using the software itself.

Threaded Texts

“I’m so used to being able to see entire messaging conversations at a swipe that I hardly even bother to absorb the words I’m looking at,” Feinberg said.

But perhaps the most eye-opening takeaway is that for the entire 30 days, she only had to charge her Razr phone 8 times. Eight times! Such is not the case with iPhones or Androids.

Caroline Moss is a tech reporter for Business Insider. Follow her on Twitter.

TODAY IN SLATE

Politics

Meet the New Bosses

How the Republicans would run the Senate.

Even by Russian Standards, Moscow’s  Anti-War March Was Surprisingly Grim

I Wrote a Novel Envisioning a Nigerian Space Program. Then I Learned Nigeria Actually Has One.

The Best Thing About the People’s Climate March in NYC

Friends Was the Last Purely Pleasurable Sitcom

The Eye

This Whimsical Driverless Car Imagines Transportation in 2059

Medical Examiner

Did America Get Fat by Drinking Diet Soda?  

A high-profile study points the finger at artificial sweeteners.

The Government Is Giving Millions of Dollars in Electric-Car Subsidies to the Wrong Drivers

A Futurama Writer on How the Vietnam War Shaped the Series

Trending News Channel
Sept. 20 2014 11:13 AM Watch Flashes of Lightning Created in a Lab  
  News & Politics
Politics
Sept. 22 2014 11:13 AM Your Own Personal Rand Paul How the libertarian hero makes his foreign policy contradictions disappear.
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 22 2014 12:07 PM Divestment Isn’t the Answer To destroy demand for fossil fuels, universities can do a lot better than just selling some stocks.
  Life
Dear Prudence
Sept. 22 2014 12:00 PM Dear Prudence Live Chat For September 22, 2014.
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 22 2014 12:21 PM Watch John Oliver Take on Miss America
  Slate Plus
Science
Sept. 22 2014 8:08 AM Slate Voice: “Why Is So Much Honey Clover Honey?” Mike Vuolo shares the story of your honey.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 22 2014 12:22 PM The Age of the Streaming TV Auteur
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 22 2014 12:14 PM Family Court Rules That You Can Serve Someone With Legal Papers Over Facebook
  Health & Science
Science
Sept. 22 2014 12:15 PM The Changing Face of Climate Change Will the leaders of the People’s Climate March now lead the movement?
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 18 2014 11:42 AM Grandmaster Clash One of the most amazing feats in chess history just happened, and no one noticed.