The Cars Thieves Most Love to Steal

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May 30 2014 10:30 AM

The Cars Thieves Most Love to Steal

72947011-the-new-honda-accord-coupe-concept-vehicle-is-introduced
Better lock up!

Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

This post first appeared on Business Insider.

For the fifth year in a row, the Honda Accord is the most stolen car in America, according to LoJack's annual Vehicle Theft Recovery Report.

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According to data gathered by the vehicle tracking firm in 2013, the Accord is followed by the Honda Civic and Toyota Camry. Even though the Ford F150 is the best-selling truck in the America, its larger sibling, the F350, is more often stolen.

In fact, GM's F150 competitor, the Chevy Silverado pickup, is not only the most stolen truck, but also the most stolen domestic branded vehicle on the LoJack's top 10. 

Perhaps the most intriguing entry on LoJack's list is the sixth-place Acura Integra. While the majority of the list consists of top sellers, the Integra has not been sold in the United States since 2001. Its popularity among thieves may be be explained by the car's popularity with aftermarket tuners, which drives demand for its parts and engines. 

According to LoJack, the most expensive car the company recovered in 2013 was a $103,400 Porsche Panamera, while the oldest car recovered was a 1963 Cadillac Convertible. The latest report also highlighted the increasing popularity of hybrid and electric vehicles, as recoveries of Toyota's Prius hybrid increased by 70 percent in 2013. 

Here is LoJack's 10 Most Stolen Vehicles in America:

  1. Honda Accord
  2. Honda Civic
  3. Toyota Camry 
  4. Toyota Corolla
  5. Chevrolet Silverado
  6. Acura Integra
  7. Cadillac Escalade
  8. Ford F350
  9. Nissan Altima
  10. Chevrolet Tahoe

Benjamin Zhang write about business and transportation for Business Insider.

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