Here's a Map of the World's Drunkest Countries 

Business Insider
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May 12 2014 4:03 PM

Here's a Map of the World's Drunkest Countries    

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Alcohol consumption varies widely across the globe, and the U.S. stacks up pretty well compared to some other countries.

As the map below from the World Health Organization shows, Russians and their neighbors drink more than almost everyone else in the world.

Portugal, Grenada, and Andorra are also ranked in the highest category at more than 12.5 liters per person over the age of 15 in 2010.

The WHO notes in its report that 48 percent of those included in this data abstain from drinking altogether. So if those people were excluded, per capita consumption among those who do drink would be even higher than what's shown on this map.

Check it out:

Canadians drink more than Americans, keeping pace with most European countries. Alcohol consumption is low in northern Africa, but the southern half of the continent sees higher drinking rates, especially South Africa and Namibia.

Alcohol consumption in Russia is a major concern. A recent study found that the high number of early deaths in Russia could be attributed to people drinking too much. Commons causes of early deaths include liver disease, alcohol poisoning, and getting into accidents or fights while drunk.

Other countries near Russia, including Ukraine and Belarus, have similar levels of alcohol consumption.

WHO's report notes that the European region contains just 14.7 percent of the world's population above the age of 15, but accounts for 25.7 percent of the total alcohol consumed worldwide. The report uses the most recent data for alcohol consumption around the world.

Pamela Engel is a reporter for Business Insider. Follow her on Twitter.

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