Calm Down—Chipotle Isn't Actually Going to Stop Serving Guacamole

Business Insider
Analyzing the top news stories across the web
March 5 2014 12:19 PM

Chipotle Isn't Going to Stop Serving Guacamole

Chipotle
Guac still sold here.

Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

This post originally appeared in Business Insider.

Don't panic about reports that climate change could threaten guacamole at Chipotle.

Advertisement

Emily Atkin at ThinkProgress noted Tuesday that the company's latest annual report discloses that guacamole and salsas could become too expensive for the company to sell if climate change starts to affect certain crops.

But people are misunderstanding the report—and the company assures us that guacamole is not going away anytime soon.

"This is strictly routine 'risk factor' language as part of the annual financial disclosure," a Chipotle spokesman told us in an email.

Chipotle notes climate change as one of the "risks related to operating in the restaurant industry" in the report, which was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.Risks like labor costs, food-borne illnesses, and competition from other businesses are also mentioned by Chipotle. Public companies are legally required to disclose these risks in SEC reports. In other words, this would be like writing a story saying that eating Chipotle could give you food poisoning.

Here's what Chipotle had to say about climate change in the report:

Increasing weather volatility or other long-term changes in global weather patterns, including any changes associated with global climate change, could have a significant impact on the price or availability of some of our ingredients. In the event of cost increases with respect to one or more of our raw ingredients we may choose to temporarily suspend serving menu items, such as guacamole or one or more of our salsas, rather than paying the increased cost for the ingredients.

The company temporarily suspended selling antibiotic-free steak in some restaurants earlier this year because of a shortage.

Ashley Lutz is a retail writer for Business Insider. Follow her on Twitter.

  Slate Plus
Culturebox
Dec. 18 2014 11:48 AM Behind the Year of Outrage  Here’s how Slate tracked down everything we were angry about in 2014.