The Hitchcock Gallery supercut: Montage shows favorite motifs and themes of the Master of Suspense (VIDEO).

A Supercut Shows What Makes Alfred Hitchcock’s Movies Look So Hitchcockian

A Supercut Shows What Makes Alfred Hitchcock’s Movies Look So Hitchcockian

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Jan. 7 2015 12:19 PM

A Supercut Shows What Makes Alfred Hitchcock’s Movies Look So Hitchcockian

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A wax figure of director Alfred Hitchcock is seen at 'The celebrity Awards Hall' exhibition at Madame Tussauds in Hollywood, California, on February 25, 2010. Forty of the Madame Tussauds Hollywood figures are Oscar winners. AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)

Photo by GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images

There are few filmmakers who have inspired as many supercuts, montages, and video essays as Alfred Hitchcock, but “The Hitchcock Gallery,” created by filmmaker Steven Benedict, may be the most impressive yet. In it, Benedict highlights a number of common visual motifs (staircases, free falls, overhead shots, close-ups of eyes, and rapid dolly movements, to name just a few) found throughout 40 of the Master of Suspense’s films, spanning from The Lodger (1927) to Family Plot (1976), his final film.

Benedict ties the themes together so meticulously that sometimes it seems as if the characters and images are all working within the same expansive film. Paired with Bernard Herrmann’s haunting score for Vertigo, this is a must-watch for Hitchcock fans.

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(Via Indiewire.)

Aisha Harris is a Slate culture writer and host of the Slate podcast Represent.