More Animals That Deserve To Be Eaten

Brow Beat
Slate's Culture Blog
March 17 2011 4:57 PM

More Animals That Deserve To Be Eaten

My essay on killing-and-grilling invasive lionfish posted Wednesday seems to have inspired a lot of justified bloodlust and, for a few readers, a further question: What other invasive species should we eat to extinction?

It turns out that invasiovorism is a good idea outside of the Florida reef. No one is cooking the tiny, polluted zebra or quagga mussels ("Most clams and mussels are edible, but that does not mean they taste good!," warns the USGS ). But Asian carp, the scourge of the upper Midwest, is considered quite edible by Chinese and Polish immigrants there (carp is a traditional Polish Christmas dish ).

The possibilities are limitless: Some enterprising foodie from the Everglades, perhaps? recently posted on Chowhound looking for python recipes . Even in cases where you can't eat the invader, there are other uses. In Louisiana, biologists are pushing for the adoption of what writer Barry Yeoman calls "righteous fur" : pelts made from Nutria, a type of invasive swamp rat.

Maybe we should stay focused on annihilating invasive sea creatures, though. The U.N. reported in February that global fish consumption has reached a new high, accounting now for 16 percent of all the animal protein people eat. Yes, as many commenters pointed out, individual lionfish may be too small to motivate commercial fisherman. But I have faith in humanity's ability to eat any animal to oblivion, if we set our minds to it. After all, we are, as Time 's Bryan Walsh put it , the "ultimate invasive species."

/blogs/browbeat/2011/03/17/more_animals_that_deserve_to_be_eaten/jcr:content/body/slate_image

Suggest other edible invasive species to @thornburgh on Twitter.

Advertisement

Photograph of Nutria courtes y of Petar Miloševic/Wikipedia .

Follow   Brow Beat on Twitter . For more   culture coverage, like   Slate   Culture   on Facebook.  

  Slate Plus
Culturebox
Dec. 18 2014 11:48 AM Behind the Year of Outrage  Here’s how Slate tracked down everything we were angry about in 2014.