Today's Google Trends: Wang Dang Doodle All Night Long

Brow Beat
Slate's Culture Blog
June 4 2009 9:53 AM

Today's Google Trends: Wang Dang Doodle All Night Long

If we are what we Google, then Google Hot Trends an hourly rundown of search terms "that experience sudden surges in popularity" is the Web's best cultural barometer. Here's a sampling of today's top searches. (Rankings on Hot Trends list current as of 9 a.m.)

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Josh Levin is Slate's executive editor.

No. 11 "tank man": On the 20 th anniversary of Tiananmen Square, Googlers want to know what happened to the man in the famous photos . The short answer: nobody knows. In 2006, PBS' Frontline ran a documentary investigating his fate; there's also a short video of the standoff on YouTube . On the New York Times ' Lens blog, four photographers who were there talk about what it was like to shoot the standoff .

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No. 15 "michael bastian": "Every time you turn a corner, there's a guy wearing skinny jeans, an ironic cap, a low V-neck tee, vintagey high-tops and a scarf," says fashion designer Michael Bastian in a Wednesday New York Times profile . "It's the equivalent of the 'Sex and the City' look that was such a thing for women a few years ago." What's Bastian's counter-aesthetic? "In his world," the Times explains, "men are still from Mars. Or at least Dartmouth." Some of the items in his unironic line: "wool tweed trousers, rugby shirts, ski sweaters, two-button suits, polos."

No. 41 "wang dang doodle": Chicago blues singer Koko Taylor, a contemporary of Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf, died on Wednesday at the age of 80 . Taylor's hit tune: 1965's "Wang Dang Doodle." In lieu of flowers, please honor the great Mrs. Taylor by romping and tromping till midnight, fussing and fighting till daylight, and pitching a wang dang doodle all night long. (Also check out this cover version by an extremely young PJ Harvey .)

 

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