Carlos Barria revisits New Orleans 10 years after Katrina.

A Photographer Who Documented Katrina’s Destruction Returns to Take Pictures of the Exact Same Spots

A Photographer Who Documented Katrina’s Destruction Returns to Take Pictures of the Exact Same Spots

Behold
The Photo Blog
Aug. 28 2015 11:02 AM

A Photographer Who Documented Katrina’s Destruction Returns to Take Pictures of the Exact Same Spots

USA-KATRINA/ANNIVERSARY
This print shows Joshua Creek looking at the height that the floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina reached at his house, Sept. 13, 2005.

Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

This week marks the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which ultimately killed at least 1,836 people, forced 1.5 million people to evacuate the region, and did an estimated $81 billion of property damage. In 2005, Carlos Barria documented the destruction. This year, he returned to locate some of the people he’d met.

He was able to track down a few of them but had difficulty finding others. To help him with his search, Barria had brought along some of the prints he had initially taken and began to revisit some of the locations captured in those images.

Barria began to play with the lines of the prints and how they fit into the modern-day locations, photographing them with the older images and capturing the differences 10 years later.

USA-KATRINA/ANNIVERSARY
This print shows Errol Morning sitting on his boat on a flooded street, Sept. 5, 2005.

Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

USA-KATRINA/ANNIVERSARY
This print shows Joshua Creek sitting on the porch of his house after Hurricane Katrina struck, Sept. 13, 2005.

Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

USA-KATRINA/ANNIVERSARY
This print shows Errol Morning sitting on his boat on a flooded street after Hurricane Katrina struck, Sept. 5, 2005.

Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

USA-KATRINA/ANNIVERSARY
This print shows a woman arriving with her dog at a collection point for victims of Hurricane Katrina, Sept. 8, 2005.

Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

“The idea was to get exactly the same frame as then, lining up the print to compare the inundated city then with the New Orleans of today,” he wrote on the Reuters photo blog the Wider Image.

“It was very interesting going back to these places as I started to get a sense of what had happened to the people I met back then. Some had moved away, crossing state lines to start a new life elsewhere. Others were still there, in some cases partly because they lacked the opportunity to move away and start over.”

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This print shows coffins removed from tombs, Sept. 10, 2005.

Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

USA-KATRINA/ANNIVERSARY
This print shows a general view of the Memorial Medical Center, Sept. 13, 2005.

Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

USA-KATRINA/ANNIVERSARY
This print shows Michael Rehage squatting on the roof of his car, Sept. 12, 2005.

Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

USA-KATRINA/ANNIVERSARY
This print shows Tyler Teal cleaning up his home, Sept. 14, 2005.

Photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

David Rosenberg is the editor of Slate’s Behold blog. He has worked as a photo editor for 15 years and is a tennis junkie. Follow him on Twitter.