San Francisco’s Forgotten Neighborhood of Bayview-Hunters Point

The Photo Blog
April 24 2014 12:04 PM

San Francisco’s Forgotten Neighborhood of Bayview-Hunters Point

A child watches as the playground at the Alice Griffith public housing development burns to the ground after being set on fire by an unknown culprit.  Alice Griffith's long-awaited redevelopment is slated to begin this year.Children gather as the playground at the Alice Griffith public housing development burns to the ground after being set on fire by an unknown culprit.  Alice Griffith's long-awaited redevelopment is slated to begin this year.
A child watches as the playground at the Alice Griffith public housing development burns to the ground after being set on fire by an unknown culprit. Plans are underway for Alice Griffith's long-awaited redevelopment.

Alex Welsh

As tech companies continue to help drive up the cost of rent in San Francisco and gentrification reshapes the face of its neighborhoods, photographer Alex Welsh decided to focus on those areas that have remained stagnant. His concentration is on forgotten, marginalized neighborhoods and the complicated geopolitics surrounding them, including Bayview-Hunters Point, located in southern San Francisco.

Bayview-Hunters Point is an area with extreme poverty. It was historically a blue-collar black neighborhood on the outskirts of a segregated city. Over the past 50 years, the neighborhood has suffered from high levels of pollution and now contains a superfund site. Many longtime residents have fled the area due to loss of industry, infrastructure, and increases in violence. As far back as 1963, James Baldwin documented the marginalization of the community stating, “this is the San Francisco America pretends does not exist.” In 2004, the Spike Lee film Sucker Free City used Hunters Point as a backdrop for a story on gentrification and street gangs.

While studying photojournalism at San Francisco State University, Welsh walked around Hunters Point and decided it would be the first community he would photograph. “My goal is to document these neighborhoods critically,” he explained. “I want to break stereotypes by embedding myself where I’m documenting the problem without perpetuating the stereotype. I want to contextualize why it is that this happens. By showing the violence but also showing the story around the violence, I hope to paint an educated picture.” He added: “I realized that many residents’ interactions with white people was only through journalists and cops. They sense that you want something from them, so it takes a long time to gain trust.”

Men show off their tattoos in Alice Griffith, also known as 'Double Rock'.
Men show off their tattoos at Alice Griffith public housing complex, also known as Double Rock.

Alex Welsh

Friends and family mourn over the death of Andre Helton, 18, who was shot and killed in his car in the early hours of he morning.  Much of Helton's family resides in Hunters Point as well as the Fillmore district where his funeral was held.
Friends and family mourn over the death of Andre Helton, 18, who was shot and killed in his car. Much of Helton's family resides in Hunters Point as well as the Fillmore district, where his funeral was held.

Alex Welsh

'Ra Ra," left, and 'Mo Drama,' right, hang from the laundry lines in the Hunters View housing projects while waiting for a friend to catch up with them.
"Ra Ra," left, and "Mo Drama" hang from the laundry lines in the Hunters View housing projects while waiting for a friend to catch up with them.

Alex Welsh

Advertisement

After a few months, Welsh, who is white, said he was able to gain the residents’ trust, including that of a women nicknamed Tweetie who helped welcome him into the community. She spread the word on the street that he was to be protected and that his intentions were good. Later in the year, the father of her newborn grandchild died in a gang-related shootout.

During the project, Welsh became close with Norris Bennett, a young man who was part of the Oakdale mob, a gang that resides on the two-block radius of the public housing units on Oakdale Avenue. He was 21 years old when he was shot dead in the Oakdale projects. Bennett was the second of five brothers to be murdered in gang violence. For his own safety, Welsh left the community and has not been back since.

Welsh currently resides in New York, where he is documenting the forgotten neighborhood of Brownsville, Brooklyn. He said one of the things different in New York, for instance, is that due to stop and frisk and a larger police force, guns are not as readily available and must be hidden. As he continues to photograph each series, his relationship to the project has matured, and he is a little more reserved with the young men he meets in gangs. “But ultimately,” he added, “if you neglect a community, it doesn’t matter why you neglect it, it will result in the same.

After a lengthy chase, Jermaine Jackson is arrested by police officers in the Hunters Veiw housing projects in Hunters Point.  With the amount of families in Hunters View dwindling by the month, tension between police and remaining residents runs high.  Jackson was charged with reckless driving police had surveyed earlier in the day.
After a lengthy chase, Jermaine Jackson is arrested by police officers in the Hunters Veiw housing projects. Jackson was charged with reckless driving. With the number of families in Hunters View dwindling each month, tensions between police and the remaining residents run high.

Alex Welsh

Residents of Hunters View celebrate the life of Martel 'Gully' Peters with a dance party on the block after his funeral.  Peters was shot 16 times in the Army street projects.  His  brother, 'Nook' and his sister 'Tati' moved out of Hunters View shortly after.
Residents of Hunters View celebrate the life of Martel "Gully" Peters with a dance party on the block after his funeral. Peters was shot 16 times. His brother and his sister moved out of Hunters View shortly after.

Alex Welsh

The 'Bread Me Out' crew  hangs outside a laundromat on 3rd Street in Hunters Point.
The "Bread Me Out" crew hangs outside a laundromat on Third Street in Hunters Point.

Alex Welsh

Women embrace at the Branner family reunion on Harbor Row in Hunters Point.
Women embrace at the Branner family reunion on Harbor Row in Hunters Point.

Alex Welsh

Lee, a resident of Hunters View, watches the inauguration  of Barak Obama.  'I grew up being told that there would never be a black president, and when I became a father I told my kids the same thing.  I can't believe this is happening.'
Lee, a resident of Hunters View, watches the inauguration of President Barack Obama. "I grew up being told that there would never be a black president, and when I became a father, I told my kids the same thing. I can't believe this is happening," Lee said.

Alex Welsh

Sophie Butcher loves books and pictures. She is a photographer and designer based in Brooklyn, N.Y. Follow her on Twitter.