Incredible Photos of Water

The Photo Blog
Sept. 19 2013 1:52 PM

Aerial Landscapes Capture Incredible Views of Water

Thjorsá River #1, Iceland 2012
Thjorsá River #1, Iceland, 2012

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Edward Burtynsky isn’t a stranger to ambitious projects. The Canadian photographer has made a career out of documenting the ways in which man transforms and redefines nature. Known primarily for large-scale photography, his previous series have covered topics including oil, mines, and recycling.

For his latest work, Burtynsky decided to focus on water. Over a five-year period, he hit 10 countries, producing a body of work that examines one of our most valuable resources. “Water” is the biggest launch of new work Burtynsky has ever released and is taking several multimedia formats including gallery exhibits, a book called Water, a documentary film titled Watermark, and an iPad app.

Burtynsky decided to divide the project into the ways we have diverted water, control it, farm with it, live with it, destroy it, and have nothing to do with it.

Advertisement

To capture the essence of water, Burtynsky shot from the air, riding in bucket trucks and flying in airplanes and helicopters with his digital Hasselblad camera. “You have to have a slightly higher point of view; standing on the ground doesn’t really tell you what’s going on,” Burtynsky said about his vantage point for the project, an aesthetic he has used in other series. “I was standing back, and I didn’t get into the minutia; I got into the bigger idea, what we do from above and looking at how we shape our landscapes based on water’s availability and what we do to [it] once we redirect it.”

Greenhouses, Almira Peninsula, Spain 2010
Greenhouses, Almira Peninsula, Spain, 2010

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Cerro Prieto Geothermal Power Station, Baja, Mexico 2012
Cerro Prieto Geothermal Power Station, Baja, Mexico, 2012

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

VeronaWalk, Naples, Florida, USA 2012
VeronaWalk, Naples, Fla., 2012

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Burtynsky said that although he included BP’s oil spill into the Gulf of Mexico in the project, the work is far from editorial in its approach. “If you look at photojournalism, it’s largely driven by current events … always chasing a crisis or disaster,” he said. “I follow a narrative that is much looser than current events. [The images] are not indictments, and they aren’t celebrations.”

To best showcase ways we use water around the world, Burtynsky included images of Indian bathers in the Ganges River, the construction of dams along China’s Yangtze River, the dry beds of the Colorado River delta, residential waterfront living in Florida, and dry land farming in rural Spain. He also spent time in Iceland and British Columbia, Canada, to capture water in its most pristine form and to show rare locations where water hasn’t been corrupted by industry. “We have to learn to think more long-term about the consequences of what we are doing, while we are doing it,” Burtynsky said. “My hope is that these pictures will stimulate a process of thinking about something essential to our survival, something we often take for granted—until it’s gone.”

“Water” is on view at New York’s Howard Greenberg Gallery and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery through Nov. 2. For a list of exhibitions around the world, visit Burtynsky’s website.

Rice Terraces #2, Western Yunnan Province, China 2012
Rice Terraces #2, Western Yunnan Province, China, 2012

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Pivot Irrigation / Suburb, South of Yuma, Arizona, USA 2011
Pivot Irrigation/Suburb, south of Yuma, Ariz., 2011

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Marine Aquaculture #1, Luoyuan Bay, Fujian Province, China 2012
Marine Aquaculture #1, Luoyuan Bay, Fujian Province, China, 2012

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Kumbh Mela #1, Haridwar, India 2010
Kumbh Mela #1, Haridwar, India, 2010

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Colorado River Delta #9, Sonora, Mexico 2012
Colorado River Delta #9, Sonora, Mexico, 2012

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Stepwell #4, Sagar Kund Baori, Bundi, Rajasthan, India 2010
Stepwell #4, Sagar Kund Baori, Bundi, Rajasthan, India, 2010

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Dryland Farming #24, Monegros County, Aragon, Spain 2010
Dryland Farming #24, Monegros County, Aragon, Spain, 2010

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Xiaolangdi Dam #1, Yellow River, Henan Province, China 2011
Xiaolangdi Dam #1, Yellow River, Henan Province, China, 2011

Photo by Edward Burtynsky. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

TODAY IN SLATE

Politics

Blacks Don’t Have a Corporal Punishment Problem

Americans do. But when blacks exhibit the same behaviors as others, it becomes part of a greater black pathology. 

I Bought the Huge iPhone. I’m Already Thinking of Returning It.

Scotland Is Just the Beginning. Expect More Political Earthquakes in Europe.

Students Aren’t Going to College Football Games as Much Anymore

And schools are getting worried.

Two Damn Good, Very Different Movies About Soldiers Returning From War

The XX Factor

Lifetime Didn’t Think the Steubenville Rape Case Was Dramatic Enough

So they added a little self-immolation.

Medical Examiner

The Most Terrifying Thing About Ebola 

The disease threatens humanity by preying on humanity.

Lifetime Didn’t Find the Steubenville Rape Case Dramatic Enough, So They Added Self-Immolation

Why Hillary Clinton and Other Democrats Are Shrewd to Frame All Issues As “Women’s Issues”

  News & Politics
Weigel
Sept. 20 2014 11:13 AM -30-
  Business
Business Insider
Sept. 20 2014 6:30 AM The Man Making Bill Gates Richer
  Life
Quora
Sept. 20 2014 7:27 AM How Do Plants Grow Aboard the International Space Station?
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 19 2014 4:58 PM Steubenville Gets the Lifetime Treatment (And a Cheerleader Erupts Into Flames)
  Slate Plus
Slate Picks
Sept. 19 2014 12:00 PM What Happened at Slate This Week? The Slatest editor tells us to read well-informed skepticism, media criticism, and more.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 20 2014 3:21 PM “The More You Know (About Black People)” Uses Very Funny PSAs to Condemn Black Stereotypes
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 19 2014 6:31 PM The One Big Problem With the Enormous New iPhone
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 20 2014 7:00 AM The Shaggy Sun
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 18 2014 11:42 AM Grandmaster Clash One of the most amazing feats in chess history just happened, and no one noticed.