Drop-Dead Gorgeous Landscapes of Mountains and Caves

The Photo Blog
June 7 2013 8:00 AM

Conquering the Matterhorn, One Frame at a Time

Matterhorn, Moonlight Clouds, 2011
Matterhorn, Moonlight Clouds, 2011

Nenad Saljic

Nenad Saljic is a patient man. Photographing nature, mainly mountains and caves, and then waiting for light and environment to alter the perceptions of those subjects is clearly not for the high-strung.

“For the Matterhorn project the main factor is anticipation, long hours of waiting for magic to happen,” Saljic wrote about his approach to shooting the last Alpine peak to be conquered. He added he has to be “ready at any time, (lots of) trial and error, experimenting with different exposures to capture the movement of the clouds and stars and of course good luck.”

Born and raised in Croatia, Saljic was introduced to photography by a math teacher in primary school who also taught him to appreciate the mountains.

Advertisement

“I spent almost every weekend taking photographs during hiking or caving trips from the age of 12 until my late 20s,” Saljic wrote. He eventually became a caving instructor and member of the Croatian Mountain Rescue Services.

Matterhorn, Running Clouds, 2009
Matterhorn, Running Clouds, 2009

Nenad Saljic

Matterhorn, Sunset Clouds, 2011
Matterhorn, Sunset Clouds, 2011

Nenad Saljic

Matterhorn, Boiling Clouds, 2010
Matterhorn, Boiling Clouds, 2010

Nenad Saljic

Left: Matterhorn, Eastern Clouds, 2012 Right: Matterhorn Night Clouds 1
Left: Matterhorn, Eastern Clouds, 2012 Right: Matterhorn Night Clouds 1

Nenad Saljic

Due to very small quotas for students to study photography in Croatia, Saljic was unable to pursue a career as a photographer and instead studied economics. He received a Ph.D from the University of Split, eventually becoming a professor and forming a consultancy business. The only time he picked up a camera during this period was when he took pictures of his wife and two daughters.

Eighteen years later, during a trekking expedition in the Everest region, “25 days without a mobile phone, without business and clients,” Saljic decided to go after his passion once again.

“It was a kind of purification and enlightenment and I realized that it was finally a time to start taking care a bit more about myself,” he wrote.

It didn’t go unnoticed. Saljic was recently recognized at the 2013 Sony World Photography Awards, where he was named Professional Landscape Photographer of the Year.

Saljic describes himself as “old school” and shoots black-and-white because that was his initial entry point into photography. “I feel grey tones much better than color,” he wrote.

“Photography is the way I see reality, what I feel about the place. It is an amalgam of my emotions and my imagination. I want to produce a different, sometimes distorted vision of reality not visible by naked eye. Black-and-white photography is the best tool to convey my vision.”

Petrified 39, 2012
Petrified 39, 2012

Nenad Saljic

Left: Petrified 3, 2010. Right: Petrified 7, 2011.
Left: Petrified 3, 2010. Right: Petrified 7, 2011.

Nenad Saljic

Documenting mountains and caves isn’t for the faint of heart—or those without patience. Working on a project for Saljic can take many years to complete. He has been working on the Matterhorn series since January 2009. “I come to Zermatt twice a year at least, usually in winter and in summer, usually by car, which means a 1,120-km drive in one direction from Split, where I live. I was in Zermatt 10 times so far, so I made more than 22,000 km driving; I made thousands of images but I have selected only 30 for my portfolio.”

For a photographer who has once again found his passion, it’s really only minutes and miles.

“Just being in nature is kind of a meditation for me. I feel a special energy on some places like the Matterhorn area or in the caves. I want to convey the same energy I felt when I was shooting,” he wrote. “However, I am not a person who brings the camera on every occasion. Sometimes I am just observing, not shooting for days or even months.”

Petrified 8, 2011
Petrified 8, 2011

Nenad Saljic

TODAY IN SLATE

Politics

Talking White

Black people’s disdain for “proper English” and academic achievement is a myth.

Hong Kong’s Protesters Are Ridiculously Polite. That’s What Scares Beijing So Much.

The One Fact About Ebola That Should Calm You: It Spreads Slowly

Operation Backbone

How White Boy Rick, a legendary Detroit cocaine dealer, helped the FBI uncover brazen police corruption.

A Jaw-Dropping Political Ad Aimed at Young Women, Apparently

The XX Factor
Oct. 1 2014 4:05 PM Today in GOP Outreach to Women: You Broads Like Wedding Dresses, Right?
Music

How Even an Old Hipster Can Age Gracefully

On their new albums, Leonard Cohen, Robert Plant, and Loudon Wainwright III show three ways.

How Tattoo Parlors Became the Barber Shops of Hipster Neighborhoods

This Gargantuan Wind Farm in Wyoming Would Be the Hoover Dam of the 21st Century

Moneybox
Oct. 1 2014 8:34 AM This Gargantuan Wind Farm in Wyoming Would Be the Hoover Dam of the 21st Century To undertake a massively ambitious energy project, you don’t need the government anymore.
  News & Politics
The World
Oct. 1 2014 12:20 PM Don’t Expect Hong Kong’s Protests to Spread to the Mainland
  Business
Moneybox
Oct. 2 2014 9:19 AM Alibaba’s Founder on Why His Company Is Killing It in China
  Life
Quora
Oct. 2 2014 8:27 AM How Do Teachers Kill the Joy of Reading for Students?
  Double X
The XX Factor
Oct. 1 2014 5:11 PM Celebrity Feminist Identification Has Reached Peak Meaninglessness
  Slate Plus
Behind the Scenes
Oct. 1 2014 3:24 PM Revelry (and Business) at Mohonk Photos and highlights from Slate’s annual retreat.
  Arts
Culturebox
Oct. 2 2014 9:08 AM Demons Are Real A horror movie goes behind the scenes on an Intervention-like reality show.
  Technology
Future Tense
Oct. 1 2014 6:59 PM EU’s Next Digital Commissioner Thinks Keeping Nude Celeb Photos in the Cloud Is “Stupid”
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Oct. 2 2014 7:30 AM What Put the Man in the Moon in the Moon?
  Sports
Sports Nut
Oct. 1 2014 5:19 PM Bunt-a-Palooza! How bad was the Kansas City Royals’ bunt-all-the-time strategy in the American League wild-card game?