The Photo Blog

Sept. 1 2014 11:00 AM

Here’s How to Vacation Norwegian Style 

For Norwegians, Syden is many different places, from Mallorca to Gran Canaria to a host of other sunny holiday destinations in Southern Europe and beyond. The term—which means “the south” in Norwegian—commonly refers to any easily accessible summer vacation spot with a “warm climate, access to water in a pool and/or sea, and cheap or at least reasonably priced food and drink,” according to Knut Egil Wang. But the destination really isn’t important; among Norwegians, Syden is like a country of its own, or, more accurately, a state of mind.

Wang spent four years photographing vacationers in Syden for his book, Southbound. “Before this project, I had been stopping by a few Syden-like places while traveling, but I had never gone there on holiday. I think you have to be in the right mindset for what these places have to offer to enjoy being there,” he said via email.

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Aug. 31 2014 11:30 AM

A Rock ’n’ Roll Star Who Uses Photography to Embrace the Darker Side of Life 

Victory Tischler-Blue views her photographs as single-framed cinematic dramas. Shot around the American Southwest (mostly within a day’s drive from her home in Palm Springs), her work, shot mostly at night, explores the idea of abandonment from a human and environmental perspective.

“You can go all over the world and describe everything or you can just say, ‘I was there’ and that’s basically what I try to do,” Tischler-Blue said about her photographs. “My work is around this edgy dark feeling about something happening; you might not know the back story but you know something is happening.”

Aug. 29 2014 11:42 AM

These Palm Springers Know How to Live the Good Life

Nancy Baron’s drive from Los Angeles to Palm Springs, California, is barely two hours long, but the catharsis she feels when arriving makes the distance feel far greater.

“I go there as much as I can regardless of how hot it is,” Baron said. “I always have this feeling that I shouldn’t be going, that I have so much to do in L.A., but when I get there and I get out of the car, it’s so relaxing: Everything is different. It smells different, the air feels different, it looks different and it’s completely transformative, it just has a magical feel to it.”

Baron first visited the quirky desert city in the 1970s and fell in love with it while lying by a pool and looking at the snow-capped mountains. A bit more than eight years ago she made it a part-time home. 

Aug. 28 2014 12:06 PM

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).

Aug. 27 2014 12:36 PM

Haunting Photographs of Artifacts From the Hiroshima Atomic Blast

Through Ishiuchi Miyako’s lens, the things we leave behind are not merely totems of ourselves, but rather objects with lives of their own. An upcoming exhibit at Andrew Roth gallery presents “Here and Now: Atomic Bomb Artifacts, ひろしま/Hiroshima 1945/2007—,” Ishiuchi's photos of objects in the archive of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum.

Aug. 26 2014 11:52 AM

What Animals Look Like When They Eat One Another 

Modern Americans, especially urban dwellers, are often removed from nature; it’s an arena usually reserved for well-manicured public parks or Discovery Channel documentaries. New York City-based Catherine Chalmers wanted to interact with the natural world in a more significant way. In the 1990s, she started raising houseflies in her apartment, and as she learned to care for them and photograph them, she realized it was a way for her to “understand something I wouldn't have access to otherwise.”

Chalmers kept careful watch over her houseflies, but she kept missing some essential aspects of their life cycle: specifically, eating and dying. She became determined to capture these two aspects when she started raising other animals, which she purchased from biological supply companies and other private sources. “I was trying to choose things that were interesting aesthetically,” Chalmers said. “Why have a brown caterpillar when you can have a turquoise one?”

Aug. 25 2014 1:08 PM

The Quiet Vulnerability of Children at the Bus Stop

As summer comes to a close and the new school year begins, the landscape across the country begins to shift with the familiar scene of children waiting at the end of their driveways for the school bus to pick them up.

When Greg Miller and his family moved to Connecticut in 2007, he took note of the lonely, often sleepy figures and thought about how quickly they are transported to a world separate from his own. The idea of photographing them for a series that focused on their vulnerability began to take shape. 

“I thought it was so beautiful, maybe after living in New York for so many years, seeing children waiting out there all by themselves, tapped into a vulnerable place,” Miller said.

Aug. 24 2014 10:38 AM

This Is What Asia’s Longest River Looks Like

At nearly 4,000 miles from mouth to source, the Yangtze River in China is the longest river in Asia and the third longest in the world. Its banks are home to about one-third of the country’s population, or around 400 million people—which is more than the entire population of the United States. For thousands of years, the Yangtze has played an essential role in China’s culture, economy, and politics, and since 1950, the river and its basin “have been the focus of much of China’s economic modernization.”

Aug. 22 2014 11:41 AM

Take a Ride in One of Mumbai’s Iconic Taxis Before It’s Too Late

There are few things that throw a traveler into a city’s culture faster than a ride in a taxi.

In Mumbai, that used to mean the once ubiquitous Premier Padmini taxi. The cars, introduced in the 1960s, are quickly becoming extinct after a 2008 law, paving the way for a more modern taxi fleet, made it illegal for cars older than 25 years to remain on the streets.

Dougie Wallace spent roughly one year documenting the drivers and passengers inside the taxis that encapsulate, both inside and out, the chaotic energy of the most populous city in India. He is set to publish a book about the series he titled “Road Wallah” by Dewi Lewis next spring.

Aug. 21 2014 1:33 PM

The Baltimore Bottle Cap Factory That Became a Haven for Musicians and Artists 

Since its construction in the 19th century, the Victorian-style warehouse on Baltimore’s Guilford Avenue has been a site for innovation, but in the last 100 years of its history, the nature of that creativity has changed. When it was first built, it was home to the Crown Cork & Seal Co., which used the space to produce bottling machines and about one-half the world’s supply of Crown Cork bottle caps (the invention of its founder, William Painter).

Crown Cork & Seal relocated to Philadelphia in the late 1950s, and by the ’60s, new businesses had moved in, including Copy Cat Printing, which placed a billboard bearing its name on the roof, earning the building its nickname, the Copycat. Most businesses moved out in the 1980s, and gradually the space converted into residences. Today, more than 140 people live in the Copycat, including scores of artists, musicians, and other creative types.

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