Spectacular Double Rainbow ... With Lightning (Video)

The entire universe in blog form
Aug. 28 2014 7:30 AM

Double Rainbow ... With Lightning!

rainbow lightning
Yes. I took a picture of rainbow lightning. This may be the single coolest thing I've ever done. Click to enspectraelectrenate.

Photo by Phil Plait, used by permission

One of the things I love about living in Boulder, Colorado, is that in the summer we tend to get afternoon storms. It’s sunny a lot here, which heats the land and evaporates water, forming clouds, and they can get a tremendous amount of energy in them. We get good downpours, and then when the storm is done, it’s done.

Because the wind blows predominantly west to east, and the storms are in the afternoon when the Sun is setting, when the clouds clear from the west the Sun shines through. If it’s still raining here, we can get extremely bright rainbows.

Advertisement

That weather pattern was common for the first couple of years I lived here, but in recent years it’s slacked off. But it’s coming back: Yesterday was a textbook case of this, and the rainbow was amazing.

Yeah, double rainbow all the way. The glow around my head’s shadow I was describing is called heiligenschein. The other optical effects—the secondary arc, the supernumerary arcs, the bright region in the center and the dark band—I’ve described recently in a post about red rainbows.

The lightning was amazing. It was so fast I didn't get a good look at it—I was paying attention to the phone screen to make sure the rainbow was visible in it—and for a moment I thought it might have been sunlight reflecting off raindrops. Then a few seconds later the thunder slammed down. It was far louder than it sounds on the video. It took about eight seconds to reach me, so the lightning was less than three kilometers away. Quite the show.

rainbow
Double the magnificent optical displays.

Photo by Phil Plait

I will never get tired of seeing things like this. Rainbows are almost cliché, but they’re one of the most magnificent optical displays nature can provide. The science behind them is really intriguing, and to me, it amplifies their beauty manyfold.

Phil Plait writes Slate’s Bad Astronomy blog and is an astronomer, public speaker, science evangelizer, and author of Death From the Skies!  

TODAY IN SLATE

Medical Examiner

Here’s Where We Stand With Ebola

Even experienced international disaster responders are shocked at how bad it’s gotten.

It’s Legal for Obama to Bomb Syria Because He Says It Is

Divestment Is Fine but Mostly Symbolic. There’s a Better Way for Universities to Fight Climate Change.

I Stand With Emma Watson on Women’s Rights

Even though I know I’m going to get flak for it.

It Is Very Stupid to Compare Hope Solo to Ray Rice

Building a Better Workplace

In Defense of HR

Startups and small businesses shouldn’t skip over a human resources department.

Why Is This Mother in Prison for Helping Her Daughter Get an Abortion?

How Ted Cruz and Scott Brown Misunderstand What It Means to Be an American Citizen

  News & Politics
Politics
Sept. 23 2014 12:43 PM Occupy Wall Street How can Hillary Clinton be both a limousine liberal and a Saul Alinsky radical?
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 23 2014 2:08 PM Home Depot’s Former Head of Security Had a Legacy of Sabotage
  Life
Outward
Sept. 23 2014 1:57 PM Would A Second Sarkozy Presidency End Marriage Equality in France?
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 23 2014 2:32 PM Politico Asks: Why Is Gabby Giffords So “Ruthless” on Gun Control?
  Slate Plus
Political Gabfest
Sept. 23 2014 3:04 PM Chicago Gabfest How to get your tickets before anyone else.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 23 2014 2:31 PM 3 Simpsons Showrunners Reflect on New Fans and the “Classic Era” Myth
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 23 2014 1:50 PM Oh, the Futility! Frogs Try to Catch Worms Off of an iPhone Video.
  Health & Science
Science
Sept. 23 2014 1:38 PM Why Is Fall Red in America but Yellow in Europe? A possible explanation, 35 million years in the making.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 18 2014 11:42 AM Grandmaster Clash One of the most amazing feats in chess history just happened, and no one noticed.