What’s Up, Dock?

Bad Astronomy
The entire universe in blog form
Nov. 19 2013 11:35 AM

Berth of a Notion

ISS and Dragon capsule
The miracle of berth.

Photo by NASA

PEDANT ALERT!

I am both a space nerd and an (absurd) word nerd (proof). This means I love space words, getting a double dose of cosmological etymology in the process.

Advertisement

So in March 2013, I added a note to a post about the SpaceX Dragon capsule rendezvousing with the International Space Station, saying that it was actually berthing to the ISS, not a docking, because the station doesn’t move under its own power. As I understood it, NASA uses the term “docking” when both vehicles are maneuverable, while “berthing” is used when only one is.

Phil Plait Phil Plait

Phil Plait writes Slate’s Bad Astronomy blog and is an astronomer, public speaker, science evangelizer, and author of Death From the Skies!  

However, this is incorrect! I got a note from Ben Honey, who told me that actually, “docking” is used when a vehicle performs the final mating with the ISS under its own power, while “berthing” is used when it is pulled in by the remote robotic manipulator Canadarm2 for mating.

And Honey should know: He’s a flight controller for the ISS!

So I sit corrected. I will update previous articles where I used the terms to link to this post so folks can get the real story. I apologize for any misconceptions I may have unintentionally promulgated myself — I looked and looked, by the way, and cannot find any notes from where I got the original mistaken info. I remember reading an explanation of it, but now cannot find it. I don’t even know if the original article I read was wrong, or if I misinterpreted it.

Ah well. Sometimes, mistakes are made. I just hope Slate doesn’t dock my pay for it.

  Slate Plus
Slate Picks
Dec. 19 2014 4:15 PM What Happened at Slate This Week? Staff writer Lily Hay Newman shares what stories intrigued her at the magazine this week.