Sandy's Big Night

The entire universe in blog form
Oct. 29 2012 9:47 AM

Sandy's Big Night

Last night On October 28, at 02:42 Eastern US time, NASA's Suomi NPP satellite took this incredible picture of Hurricane Sandy, poised to strike the coast:

Phil Plait Phil Plait

Phil Plait writes Slate’s Bad Astronomy blog and is an astronomer, public speaker, science evangelizer, and author of Death from the Skies!  

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[Click to coriolisenate, or download the typhoonesized 3500 x3500 pixel version.]

Suomi-NPP has fantastic imaging capabilities, including a camera which can "see" across the spectrum from green light out into the infrared. City lights in the southeast are easy to spot from their own glow, while Sandy's dangerous clouds are illuminated by the nearly full Moon. I recommend getting the super-hi-res image and simply scanning around. The detail is amazing.

I suppose this is how a mouse feels, staring into the eyes of snake. There is a simultaneous dread, paralyzing fear, and entrancing beauty to hurricanes seen from space. I marvel when I see these... and then I remember the dozen or so hurricanes I've lived and driven through; the adrenaline surges every time I heard a branch crash down; the lying in bed at night awake, wondering what I'd awaken to. There can be terror in beauty.

I escaped all that by moving to Colorado, trading it all instead for flooding, fires, drought... we all have our crosswind to bear, I suppose. But in this case, Sandy is clearly the front page news. If you're in its path, stay safe and warm.

Image credit: Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon/NASA/NOAA/DoD