Crowdsource: what are good astronomy books for kids?

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April 5 2012 11:00 AM

Crowdsource: what are good astronomy books for kids?

I get a lot of email from folks asking me questions. Many times, these are easily searchable on Google (fair warning: if I get these, I delete 'em. Use Google, people!), and other times they're something I can answer easily. The most common ones are about careers in astronomy and what telescope they should buy (I need to start a FAQ).

I got one the other day, though, that stumped me. A woman asked me what astronomy books were good for her 10 year old child.

Phil Plait Phil Plait

Phil Plait writes Slate’s Bad Astronomy blog and is an astronomer, public speaker, science evangelizer, and author of Death From the Skies!  

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Here's the thing: I don't know. There are lots of books, but I haven't read them! I've never needed to. I know a few for younger kids and older kids (the latter is easy, since any popular level book is good; if the kid doesn't understand something then they can go to the internet and get more info). But at that age I'm just not familiar with the literature that's out there.

And honestly, I don't know all the books available anyway! So what's an internationally beloved astronomy blogger to do?

Ah HA! Ask the readers. You folks read astronomy stuff (that's tautological), so there must be tons of people reading this who would know.

So I ask you: what books do you recommend for parents with kids interested in space, science, and astronomy? Please leave a comment below, and give the name of the book, the author, and the age you think it fits, and I'll collect them in a little while and repost them all as a compiled list (give a URL if you can, and e-books are good too!). That way, we can all help excite the next generation of astronomy enthusiasts. And who knows? You might just help spark a fire in a young mind that will lead to a lifelong interest, even a career, in astronomy.


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