Texas State Board of Education confirms irony is dead

Texas State Board of Education confirms irony is dead

Texas State Board of Education confirms irony is dead

Bad Astronomy
The entire universe in blog form
Sept. 24 2010 8:30 PM

Texas State Board of Education confirms irony is dead

As I wrote a couple of days ago, the Texas State Board of Education was considering a resolution condemning textbooks they perceived as having a pro-Islam, anti-Christian slant. As I also pointed out, this is the very same BoE that has been removing science from the state standards and replacing it with provably wrong ideas: creationism, anti-evolution, downplaying the Big Bang model of the Universe, and so on.

Friday, they voted to pass the resolution. So this fervently fundamentalist majority on the BoE has said they don't like it when a religion tries to wedge itself into a textbook. As long as it isn't their religion, of course.

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Phil Plait writes Slate’s Bad Astronomy blog and is an astronomer, public speaker, science evangelizer, and author of Death From the Skies!  

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So congratulations, Texas Board of Education, you have once again managed to make yourselves, and, sadly, the rest of America, look foolish in the eyes of the entire world.

In case you think I'm being unfair, here is what a moderate Board member said:

"This resolution just seems senseless," said board member Rick Agosto, of San Antonio. "It makes this board look like we're cuckoo, which we are."

By the way, Board member Lawrence Allen, Jr., of Houston, is Muslim.

I will point out once again that two women are running for seats on the Board who are actually qualified in the field of education and understand what is actually needed when it comes to BoE business. The conservative majority on the Texas BoE are hell-bent on destroying the education of the children in that state. Hopefully it's not too late to stop them. I'll note this ridiculous resolution passed by a 7-6 vote. If one member -- one member -- of the Board of Education's majority had been replaced by someone more moderate, the vote would've gone down a far more reality-based path.

Tip o' the ten gallon hat to Ian Young.