Herschels eyes the infrared Southern Cross

Bad Astronomy
The entire universe in blog form
Oct. 2 2009 8:30 AM

Herschels eyes the infrared Southern Cross

The hits from space keep on coming! Take a peek at this new image from Europe's Herschel space telescope, which peers at the Universe's far-infrared light:

Phil Plait Phil Plait

Phil Plait writes Slate’s Bad Astronomy blog and is an astronomer, public speaker, science evangelizer, and author of Death From the Skies!  


Advertisement

[As usual, click it to embiggen.]

Very pretty! This image is a composite of five separate images taken with two cameras (PACS and SPIRE), which together cover a wavelength range of light of 70 out to 500 microns -- and, bearing in mind the reddest wavelength the human eye can see is about 0.8 microns, you can see that this is way, way out in the infrared.

What you're seeing here are cold dust clouds in the constellation of Crux, the Southern Cross. It was thought these regions would be fairly smooth on these scales, but Herschel is revealing that in fact they're pretty turbulent. You can see ribbons and filaments of material here, caused by stars forming deep in these dense clouds. You can the odd proplyd or two; small (well, much bigger than our solar system but small-looking here) disks of matter, very dense clouds with stars forming in their cores. Proplyd is short for protoplanetary disks, because these structures are in the process of forming solar systems much like ours. And you can also see long fingers of material; towers of matter where newly-born stars are eroding and blowing away the dust with their stellar winds. In a sense, these are like cosmic sandbars, material being sculpted by fluids flowing past them.

Star formation can take place in such thickly-choked regions, but visible light cannot penetrate them; even to Hubble this would be dark material and we could only see the very surface of these clouds. But Herschel sees the kind of infrared light that passes right through the dust, so astronomers can look into the hearts of these areas and learn about star formation. We know quite a bit already, but there are still gaps in our knowledge because these clouds are so thick and difficult to study. With Herschel now on the prowl, we can expect to find out a lot about how stars are born... and also to see more pretty images like this one.

TODAY IN SLATE

Culturebox

The Ebola Story

How our minds build narratives out of disaster.

The Budget Disaster That Completely Sabotaged the WHO’s Response to Ebola

PowerPoint Is the Worst, and Now It’s the Latest Way to Hack Into Your Computer

The Shooting Tragedies That Forged Canada’s Gun Politics

A Highly Unscientific Ranking of Crazy-Old German Beers

Education

Welcome to 13th Grade!

Some high schools are offering a fifth year. That’s a great idea.

Culturebox

The Actual World

“Mount Thoreau” and the naming of things in the wilderness.

Want Kids to Delay Sex? Let Planned Parenthood Teach Them Sex Ed.

Would You Trust Walmart to Provide Your Health Care? (You Should.)

  News & Politics
Politics
Oct. 22 2014 9:42 PM Landslide Landrieu Can the Louisiana Democrat use the powers of incumbency to save herself one more time?
  Business
Continuously Operating
Oct. 22 2014 2:38 PM Crack Open an Old One A highly unscientific evaluation of Germany’s oldest breweries.
  Life
Dear Prudence
Oct. 23 2014 6:00 AM Monster Kids from poorer neighborhoods keep coming to trick-or-treat in mine. Do I have to give them candy?
  Double X
The XX Factor
Oct. 22 2014 4:27 PM Three Ways Your Text Messages Change After You Get Married
  Slate Plus
Tv Club
Oct. 22 2014 5:27 PM The Slate Walking Dead Podcast A spoiler-filled discussion of Episodes 1 and 2.
  Arts
Culturebox
Oct. 22 2014 11:54 PM The Actual World “Mount Thoreau” and the naming of things in the wilderness.
  Technology
Future Tense
Oct. 22 2014 5:33 PM One More Reason Not to Use PowerPoint: It’s The Gateway for a Serious Windows Vulnerability
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Oct. 23 2014 7:30 AM Our Solar System and Galaxy … Seen by an Astronaut
  Sports
Sports Nut
Oct. 20 2014 5:09 PM Keepaway, on Three. Ready—Break! On his record-breaking touchdown pass, Peyton Manning couldn’t even leave the celebration to chance.