Scott Sigler is CONTAGIOUS

Bad Astronomy
The entire universe in blog form
Dec. 16 2008 9:00 AM

Scott Sigler is CONTAGIOUS

... and I want to help infect you.

Regular readers may remember Scott from The Night of Silliness at Dragon*Con, or you may know him as a famous writer and podcaster.

Phil Plait Phil Plait

Phil Plait writes Slate’s Bad Astronomy blog and is an astronomer, public speaker, science evangelizer, and author of Death From the Skies!  

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I know he's a talented guy, so when I found out he had written a science-based horror novel called Infected, I had to read it. I love scary stuff, and this did not disappoint. It's fast-paced, well-developed, and many times gave me the heebie-jeebies. Turns out, chicken scissors can be used with great effect in the hands -- so to speak -- of a writer like Scott.

Now he has written a sequel called Contagious, and my copy has not yet arrived (it comes out December 30), but I'm thinking it's going to be really good. He's already started podcasting it on his site, so if you're some kind of young kid who likes to listen to books instead of hold them in your hands like you're supposed to, GET OFF MY LAWN and go to his site to download the episodes.

To help promote his book, he roped me into this actually pretty cool idea: he has created a dozen posters with plot hints on them, but you need to collect all 12 to figure it out. He set up one poster each for twelve of the bestest, well-writtenest, all-around-awesomest websites he could find, and whaddyaknow, I made the cut. So here's the poster from Scott to me to you:


Click it to download the hi-res version, or you can grab a PDF of it from Scott.

But wait! There's more! Some creative soul made a trailer for the book. This is maybe a little NSFW and probably NSF young 'uns, too.


So, you want the other 11 posters? Then you'll have to go to these blogs:

Only then will the secret be revealed. Go get 'em all!

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