Today Me, Tomorrow You: Rome's Memento Mori Tombs

Your Guide to the World's Hidden Wonders
Aug. 6 2014 10:25 AM

Today Me, Tomorrow You: Rome's Memento Mori Tombs

santagostino
Sant’Agostino, memorial to Cardinal Giuseppe Ranato Imperiali, by Paolo Posi (design) and Pietro Bracci (statuary), 1741.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

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The Catholic churches in Rome are full of skeletons. While the bodies of the saints are often the most famous examples, the skeletons lurk around the tombs of the clergy and laity as well. Unlike the saints, the physical remains of former parishioners are largely kept out of sight, but if you imagine the number of bodies resting just beyond every surface, the churches start to look like mega-necropoli. You realize you're walking though Tokyos made of tombs.

You don't need an over-active imagination though; the Baroque skulls and life-sized marble skeletons decorating the graves are designed to grab your attention and speak to you. At Santa Maria dell'Orazione e Mort a skeleton delivers a message to the living on the street from the dead inside the crypt: "Hodie mihi. Cras tibi." "Today me. Tomorrow you." It shrugs. The skeletons are eager to remind you that the bones holding you up will be all that's left some day.

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Though their rhetoric is grim, the skeletons are surprisingly lively. At San Francesco d'Assisi a Ripa Grande, they climb out from behind the artwork. At Gesù e Maria, one appears frozen in the middle of a solo danse macabre, flailing so wildly it seems to be coming apart. It's this kinetic quality that's so arresting; life bursts supernaturally from these dark corners devoted to death. The juxtaposition is unsettling but it illustrates the Catholic belief in eternal life. Though the skeletons tell you that you too will die, they're also showing you they believe there is another life to come.

gesu_e_maria
Gesù e Maria, memorial to Camillo del Corno by Domenico Guidi, 1682.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

san_francesco_dassisi_a_ripa_grande
San Francesco d’Assisi a Ripa Grande, memorial to Maria Camilla and Giovanni Battista Rospigliosi, skeleton by Michele Garofolino, 1713.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

san_pietro_in_montorio
San Pietro in Montorio: Detail of the relief carved on the tomb of Girolamo Raimondi by Niccolo Sale, chapel designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, 1640.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

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San Pietro in Vincoli, memorial to Cardinal Cinzio Aldobrandini by Carlo Bizzaccheri, died 1610.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

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San Pietro in Vincoli, memorial to Cardinal Mariano Pietro Vecchiarelli, died 1639.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

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Sant’Eustachio, memorial to Silvio Cavallieri, 1717.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

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Santa Maria del Popolo, tomb of Giovanni Battista Gisleni, made for himself prior to his death in 1672.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

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Santa Maria del Popolo, tomb of Princess Maria Eleonora Boncompagni Ludovisi, died 1745.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

santa_maria_dellorazione_e_morte_1
Detail of the façade of Santa Maria dell'Orazione e Morte, designed by Ferdinando Fuga, 1738. The inscription on the scroll reads, “Today me, tomorrow you.”

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

santa_maria_dellorazione_e_morte_2
Façade of Santa Maria dell'Orazione e Morte, designed by Ferdinando Fuga, 1738.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

santa_maria_sopra_minerva_1
Santa Maria sopra Minerva, memorial to Carlo Emanuele Vizzani, by Domenico Guidi, 1661.

Photo: Elizabeth Harper

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