Nouriel Roubini

Nouriel Roubini is chairman of Roubini Global Economics and professor of economics at New York University's Stern School of Business.

Project Syndicate
July 28 2013 7:00 AMWhat if the Emerging Markets Aren’t?Growth has slowed in the BRICS, Turkey, and other countries. What does that mean?
Project Syndicate
June 9 2013 6:45 AMThe Shine Is OffParanoid investors pushed gold to $1,900 an ounce in 2011, but the bubble has burst.
Project Syndicate
April 7 2013 7:30 AMA Rose Among ThornsThe U.S. economy has its problems, but it’s still better than everywhere else.
Project Syndicate
Jan. 27 2013 7:30 AMPreparing for a Perfect StormStagnation in the developed world, uncertainty in China, and political instability in the Middle East could make for a rough 2013.
Project Syndicate
July 22 2012 7:30 AMWe’re Not Even Close to a Robust RecoveryHere are five reasons why.
Project Syndicate
April 15 2012 6:00 AMWhy the Eurozone Crisis Is Getting WorseEurope has an austerity strategy. It needs a growth strategy.
Project Syndicate
Feb. 16 2012 4:56 PMAusterity. China. The Housing Market. The Middle East.Four reasons to stay gloomy about the global economy.
Project Syndicate
Nov. 11 2011 1:58 PMToo Big to Fail, Too Big to SaveThe economic collapse of Italy will destroy the euro.
Moneybox
Sept. 19 2011 12:29 PMHow To Prevent a DepressionEight drastic policy measures necessary to prevent global economic collapse. None of them will be popular.
Project Syndicate
July 20 2011 1:08 PMHow To Save EuropeHelping Greece avert default will also help save the euro and the Eurozone.
Project Syndicate
May 16 2011 4:12 PMCan Europe Be Saved?Time is running out to rescue the economies of Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece, and Spain.
Project Syndicate
March 15 2011 1:09 PMTransformation and StagflationHow Middle East unrest endangers the global economy—and what the world can do about it.
Project Syndicate
Feb. 15 2011 3:30 PMA World AdriftWhy there is no global leadership on climate change, trade policy, energy, and too many other issues.
Project Syndicate
Dec. 18 2010 12:10 AMHow To Save EuropeHow the Continent's stronger economies can rescue its weaker ones.
Project Syndicate
June 30 2013 7:00 AMA New Period of Uncertainty and Volatility Has BegunWait, the previous one ended?
Project Syndicate
May 5 2013 7:15 AMIs the Fed Blowing Bubbles?If we exit QE3 too quickly, the economy will crash. Too slowly, and we’ll see a finance bubble.
Project Syndicate
March 3 2013 7:45 AMAll of Your Quantitative Easing Questions, AnsweredWhen is it ineffective? When is it justified? And what about unintended consequences?
Project Syndicate
Sept. 16 2012 11:56 AMIgnore the Rising MarketsThere are still plenty of reasons for concern in Europe, the United States, and China.
Politics
May 18 2012 6:20 AMGreece Must GoThe nation is likely to leave the eurozone sooner or later. Sooner is better.
Project Syndicate
March 17 2012 7:03 AMThe Fear PremiumOil supplies are up, and demand is down. But the conflict between Israel and Iran threatens to cause another global recession.
Project Syndicate
Jan. 16 2012 7:15 AMDon’t Believe the Good NewsConsumers are income-challenged, wealth-challenged, and debt-constrained. That doesn’t bode well for 2012.
Moneybox
Oct. 13 2011 3:28 PMWorld Class WarfareWhy almost every continent on Earth is experiencing social and political turmoil.
Project Syndicate
Aug. 15 2011 2:17 PMIs Capitalism Doomed?Karl Marx was right that globalization, financial intermediation, and income redistribution could lead capitalism to self-destruct.
Project Syndicate
June 22 2011 3:27 PMThat Stalling FeelingCan anything prevent a double-dip recession? Governments are running out of tools to avert it.
Project Syndicate
April 14 2011 2:43 PMBeijing's Empty Bullet TrainsIs China investing way too much in its infrastructure?
Roubini Data View
March 8 2011 10:07 AMYoung, Poor, and JoblessWhich Middle Eastern countries are most susceptible to revolution?
Project Syndicate
Jan. 15 2011 7:06 AMRecovery Ahead?If everything breaks right, the global economy could grow by 4 percent in 2011.